Basement floors.

Discussion in 'Electrical and Wiring' started by jscholl411, Sep 18, 2006.

  1. Sep 18, 2006 #1

    jscholl411

    jscholl411

    jscholl411

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    I have a townhouse that was built in 01/02. I am in the process of finishing the basement into two rooms, laundry and family. In the laundry I would like to put vinyl tile, and in the family room I would like to place carpet and tile around the bar. What type of vapor barrier if needed would you place down? would you raise the floor. Would you just place a carpet pad down? Just want to get ideas.. Thanks....
     
  2. Sep 18, 2006 #2

    Kerrylib

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    Our house has carpeting and vinyl tile in the basement.

    The carpeting has the pad directly on the concrete.

    The vinyl tile is the self adhesive type. We just had sewer line replaced and had to cut out a section of the carpet. We replaced it with tiles. I simply applied a sealer to the concrete before putting down the tiles. The sealant was right in with the supplies for the tiles. Things like grout sealer, vinyl adhesive, etc.

    The other tiles in the laundry room are similar style and I can't comment about any sealer put down for them since that was a previous owner's work.

    Good luck. Don't forget to use treated lumber anywhere you attach to the concrete, float the walls, etc.
     
  3. Sep 23, 2006 #3

    wienerwater

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    I once had peel and stick tiles put down on concrete, that was painted/sealed, and the first time I had a water leak, the tiles pulles up like shingles. In many cases, you will find the tile is basically just stuck to the paint/sealer, obviously, and if the bond was not strong to the concrete, the whole works can lift, paint and all. Be careful!If I was to do it again, I would use a more commercial tile, one that you would apply glue and stick, since it's a thick/tougher tile, it should stay put and not flex like shingle should it ever get wet, since water won't get below it so easily.Carpet with backing will go down no problem, again the glue helps it stay put.
     
  4. Sep 23, 2006 #4

    K2eoj

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    Pardona Me. You need to be seeking advice specific to your area. I'm also in Colorado and would not think of giving advice on vapor barriers 50 ft away not to mention 2500 miles away. Soils/moisture are a funny thing and very unpredictable. Sounds like your doing your homework. Don't get in to big a rush.
     
  5. Feb 23, 2007 #5

    pmh1221

    pmh1221

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    I live in Connecticut and want to cover my attic floor inexpensively. It is not heated or air-conditioned and has a plywood subfloor. Can I use those peel-n-stick vynil tiles or will the dryness & humitidy cause a problem?
     
  6. Feb 23, 2007 #6

    glennjanie

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    Yes, you may use peel and stick; there should be no problem.
    However, I prefer sheet vinyl; tiles drive me nuts.
    Glenn
     
  7. Feb 24, 2007 #7

    Daryl in Nanoose

    Daryl in Nanoose

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    Vapor Barrier is only used on concrete floors where laminate flooring is installed or a sub floor is being installed.
    For carpet on concrete use a hi end underpad, it will keep your toes a little warmer compared to the inexpensive pad.
    One coat of sealer on bare concrete is a very good idea.
    As far as raising the floor, with a raised floor you will have Vapor barrier, foam insulation and a wood substructure which ends up being a nicer floor to walk on and spend time on since it has a little give and is warmer and will be a little bit better on the heating costs down there. I myself would do this because I do not like spending a lot of time on a concrete based floor and I do not like carpet but that is just my own opinion.
    If you like carpet then use a good under pad and you will be just fine. As far as the laundry room goes sticky tiles will work but if you get a lot of water on there they will lift. I would go with Vinyle sheet or better ceramic tile.
     
  8. Feb 24, 2007 #8

    pmh1221

    pmh1221

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    :) Thanks Glenn.
     
  9. Feb 25, 2007 #9

    Daryl

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    Peel and stick tile can be used , I would suggest sealing the floor with a sealer made for the purpose . By sealing the wood pores the glue in the back of the tile will not dry out. By not sealing the pores the wood surface will draw the solvents out of the glue too fast and cause the tile to loosen quite prematurely due to loss of adhesion.
     
  10. Feb 25, 2007 #10

    Square Eye

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    Before you do anything, lay a piece of plastic or vinyl on the floor and leave it for 24 to 48 hours. When you lift it up, look to see if the floor is dark from moisture, If there is moisture in the concrete, you will have trouble keeping anything stuck to the floor.
     
  11. Feb 26, 2007 #11

    Daryl in Nanoose

    Daryl in Nanoose

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    Great tip Tom, I will have to remember that one.
     

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