Basement Framing for HVAC

Discussion in 'General Home Improvement Discussion' started by jjohnston, Jan 3, 2017.

Help Support House Repair Talk by donating:

  1. Jan 9, 2017 #121

    jjohnston

    jjohnston

    jjohnston

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2009
    Messages:
    108
    Likes Received:
    6
    Thanks everyone!
     
  2. Jan 10, 2017 #122

    GBR

    GBR

    GBR

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2009
    Messages:
    402
    Likes Received:
    38
    IMHO, don't use any wet wood as you want to cover it before it can totally dry out... and tar paper is not recommended under a bottom plate- it is from 5-30 perms, use some foil-faced 1/2" rigid foam board for an air/water/thermal break to the studs- they may let you use non-pt wood (full of chemicals) ask them; http://www.greenbuildingadvisor.com...ressure-treated-sill-plates-and-building-code

    I'd be surprised if they want a double top plate in all your non-bearing walls, a simple metal strap at intersections- if required--will meet code and save a lot of money. Much easier to nail the wall to the floor joists above with a single plate on each end of wall on the floor before you stand them. Add blocking backers between joists for the running walls, not like they are going anywhere...

    Minn. is 15/19 R-value, so unless you do some foam board on concrete wall first and make up the rest with 2x4 insulation.... ask locally- they may let you combine the 2 types for a total; http://energycode.pnl.gov/EnergyCodeReqs/index.jsp?state=Minnesota

    Gary
     
  3. Jan 10, 2017 #123

    jjohnston

    jjohnston

    jjohnston

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2009
    Messages:
    108
    Likes Received:
    6
    Our builder did r-10 on the iutside, so my r 10 on the inside should get me my r20 right?
     
  4. Jan 10, 2017 #124

    jjohnston

    jjohnston

    jjohnston

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2009
    Messages:
    108
    Likes Received:
    6
    I'm going to do wood studs and buy tomorrow. Thanks every ok e!
     
    nealtw likes this.
  5. Jan 11, 2017 #125

    KULTULZ

    KULTULZ

    KULTULZ

    JACK of All Trades ~ MASTER of NONE

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2015
    Messages:
    361
    Likes Received:
    84
    OK, I am no professional but I have a fear of metal studs in a basement due to possible humidity/water leaks and such. Am I overly paranoid?

    Also, can BLUEWOOD be used in place of PT for floor plates (on slab)? Roofing felt is no longer recommended for use under floor plate?

    Confused In W (By GOD) V... :confused:
     
  6. Jan 11, 2017 #126

    nealtw

    nealtw

    nealtw

    Contractor retired

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2010
    Messages:
    24,701
    Likes Received:
    3,360
    Location:
    Chiliwack BC Canada
    Around here commercial units will get metal studs for dividing up space and beside stairs, great for fire proofing but when it comes to office space washroom or anything that had a floor above, we were there to put in wood structure. We never see it in a basement, I would still want sill gasket under it.

    Tarpaper? Sill gasket is already the right width.:p

    You really want to limit the amount of treated lumber in the living space.

    Painted lumber, we don't see it here yet but I am told it is great for cleaning up after a flood or mold growth, Really shortens dry out time.
     
  7. Jan 11, 2017 #127

    KULTULZ

    KULTULZ

    KULTULZ

    JACK of All Trades ~ MASTER of NONE

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2015
    Messages:
    361
    Likes Received:
    84
    OK, but the sill gasket will stop heat transfer to the slab but the tar paper will stop the moisture wicking from the slab into the framing, right (I actually used both)?

    When I papered my first sill/bottom plates, I actually also wrapped the sides with the paper (Advanced CDO), not thinking it would slow the drying of the PT.

    Learn something everyday... :(
     
  8. Jan 11, 2017 #128

    nealtw

    nealtw

    nealtw

    Contractor retired

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2010
    Messages:
    24,701
    Likes Received:
    3,360
    Location:
    Chiliwack BC Canada
    Your not worried about the moisture in the lumber, it will dry, you are stopping the moisture from wicking up thru concrete to the wood. Any thing that stops moisture is usually acceptable but I have seen old tar paper break down years later when you take stuff apart. Sill gasket is the best because it will fill the voids and stop the water, I doubt it has much R values.
     
  9. Jan 11, 2017 #129

    Snoonyb

    Snoonyb

    Snoonyb

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2006
    Messages:
    3,748
    Likes Received:
    712
    Humidity is a direct function of the comfort heat system and there is no "wicking" in steel.

    This is always interesting to me, because if a home owner does not have an approved set of plans, I'm not interested, and when they do, and neither of us are in jeopardy, I follow the plan.
     
  10. Jan 11, 2017 #130

    KULTULZ

    KULTULZ

    KULTULZ

    JACK of All Trades ~ MASTER of NONE

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2015
    Messages:
    361
    Likes Received:
    84
    GOTCHA! :)

    Felt will break down over time allowing wicking and sill gasket provides a moisture barrier (I guess it does as it is also used on sill plates) in addition to a thermal barrier. I was overbuilding... :(

    But, isn't felt called for by code under a floor plate (on crete)?
     
  11. Jan 11, 2017 #131

    Snoonyb

    Snoonyb

    Snoonyb

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2006
    Messages:
    3,748
    Likes Received:
    712
    All of the potential shortcoming in wood framing in a basement, are not found in steel, and why I use it.

    I also warranty my work for the length of time the original person contracted with occupies the dwelling.
     
  12. Jan 11, 2017 #132

    jjohnston

    jjohnston

    jjohnston

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2009
    Messages:
    108
    Likes Received:
    6
    My plan was all treated wood on the basement floor with a sill gasket under it. Do I need treated if I am doing a sill gasket?

    Also, I have one wall that has 4 2x6 studs holding up my load bearing header or whatever its called. when I figure my 2x4 wall with a 2" insulation behind it that is only 5.5". is 1/2" ok to drywall around, or am I better off trying to pull the whole wall forward 1/2 inch? and if I pull the whole wall out 1/2 inch, do I need to add another 1/2" sheet of insulation behind the wall because of a fire block or anything like that? Just trying to figure out the best way to frame around that support. I don't know if drywall can be screwed to that type of thing or not since its structural.
     
  13. Jan 11, 2017 #133

    nealtw

    nealtw

    nealtw

    Contractor retired

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2010
    Messages:
    24,701
    Likes Received:
    3,360
    Location:
    Chiliwack BC Canada
    That what we did But Gary just pointed out the code change so now it is gasket
     
    KULTULZ likes this.
  14. Jan 11, 2017 #134

    nealtw

    nealtw

    nealtw

    Contractor retired

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2010
    Messages:
    24,701
    Likes Received:
    3,360
    Location:
    Chiliwack BC Canada
    Treated on the bottom may be code in some places and against code in others.

    So best you check. The post holding up a beam is called a point load. And I would just adjust the wall to match for a 1/2", as long as it doesn't screw the lay out somewhere else
     
  15. Jan 11, 2017 #135

    jjohnston

    jjohnston

    jjohnston

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2009
    Messages:
    108
    Likes Received:
    6
    OK, so if I pull that wall forward can I have a 1/2 inch air gap behind? I can check with the inspector too and see, but I wanted to make sure it wouldn't be against fire code or something weird.
     
  16. Jan 11, 2017 #136

    nealtw

    nealtw

    nealtw

    Contractor retired

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2010
    Messages:
    24,701
    Likes Received:
    3,360
    Location:
    Chiliwack BC Canada
    You want to build your wall with a gap there anyway in case it is not perfectly straight. the fire stop is the drywall at the ceiling.
     
  17. Jan 11, 2017 #137

    jjohnston

    jjohnston

    jjohnston

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2009
    Messages:
    108
    Likes Received:
    6
    OH, Thanks!! I would have just slammed it right against the insulation!! I am checking with the inspector, but I may step down to 1" R-5 rigid insulation tuck taped and glued to the walls, then leave 1/2" gap behind, except that one wall, that one i'll make flush with the point load.

    the builder installed R-10 rigid insulation on the outside of the block, so if I do R-5 on the inside, I believe that will give me my R-15 requirement. then if i want I can add Roxul to add more if I want... not sure if that would be over kill or not. I estimate it would cost me $900 for enough Roxul...
     
  18. Jan 11, 2017 #138

    nealtw

    nealtw

    nealtw

    Contractor retired

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2010
    Messages:
    24,701
    Likes Received:
    3,360
    Location:
    Chiliwack BC Canada
    I would choose between fiber glass and safe and sound by price only.
    If your foam passes code and you think you may more consider just the top half. or just to the depth of the frost level in the area. For many years here that is all we had to insulate and basements were comfortable.
     
  19. Jan 11, 2017 #139

    jjohnston

    jjohnston

    jjohnston

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2009
    Messages:
    108
    Likes Received:
    6
    Ok, I thought maybe the Roxul due to moisture, but then I guess that is what my rigid is for, that is my moisture barrier, so I shouldn't need to worry about moisture in relation to in wall fiberglass right?

    Fiberglass insulation is about half the price.
     
  20. Jan 11, 2017 #140

    nealtw

    nealtw

    nealtw

    Contractor retired

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2010
    Messages:
    24,701
    Likes Received:
    3,360
    Location:
    Chiliwack BC Canada
    Wet insulation is no insulation but when it gets wet you can take fiber glass out and let it dry and re use it. And somewhere there is chart on sound and I think fiber glass is actually better.
     

Draft saved Draft deleted

Share This Page