Bathroom Remodeling Questions

Discussion in 'General Home Improvement Discussion' started by JoeLink, Aug 8, 2014.

  1. Aug 8, 2014 #1

    JoeLink

    JoeLink

    JoeLink

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    I knew when I bought this first home of mine that I'd need to remodel the bathroom, which was in very sad shape.

    I pulled up the cheap, cracked vinyl and found the subfloor was pretty soft, definitely in need of replacement. I want to put a bit of money into the bathroom, so I also removed the shower surround, and I'm considering replacing the bathtub (opinions?).

    My plan is to tile the floor and the shower surround. Considering this, what subfloor should I put down and how should I do it? It is just a matter of cutting it to size, then securing it to the joists? I haven't decided whether I'll be replacing the bathtub. Does the tub sit on the floor, requiring me to pull it, or on the joists themselves? Where can I find more information on building the tile shower surround?

    A few of my DIY friends have asked me why I won't be laying the tile myself. They'd help me, they all live in other states. Is it difficult to do it yourself and have good results?

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    I noticed this was a little odd, the way they did the drywall. It looks like the tub didn't quite fit between the studs, so they extended them, then extended the drywall. It looks very unprofessional in my opinion, what's the best way to correct this so everything is flush?

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    Another thing is the exhaust fan above the shower, which has clearly seen better days. I purchased one of these Panasonic recessed fans, but I'm not sure how one would go about fixing the ceiling and reducing the size of the hole. A buddy of mine said the ceiling is lath and plaster, but I didn't think they used lath and plaster in the 1970's (when this condo was built)?

    imgur: the simple image sharer

    If you have any other ideas for this mini-bathroom, I'd love to hear them :)
     
  2. Aug 8, 2014 #2

    nealtw

    nealtw

    nealtw

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    For user freindly, but a little pricy
    http://www.schluter.com/8_4_kerdi_shower_kit.aspx
    The ceiling does look like it could be plaster, likely over drywall instead of lathe. That will require attic work, so you may need an HVAC guy to install that and add the hook up to the electrical work. I would remove it and just patch the hole with drywall while you figure out how to refinish it and have the new fan installed else about.
    The tub will be sitting on the subfloor and if you change it out, that would be first on the list.
    Read the label on the floor, if that is 1/4" plywood underlayment for vinyl floor, it will be stapled down and will need to be pulled up.
    If you put a backerboard type product on the floor, you put thin set under it and screw it to the subfloor not the joists.
     
    zannej likes this.
  3. Aug 8, 2014 #3

    JoeLink

    JoeLink

    JoeLink

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    Thanks neal, you're very helpful on here. The more I think of it, the more I really like the idea of doing away with the tub and going the glass shower route, which would certainly be more in-line with the rest of the condo. Thank you for the link to that kit. It's a little expensive, but watching the video, I think it's worth it!

    Here's a pic for an idea of the tiny space I have to work with. This is the only bathroom in the condo. My hope is a walk-in shower would really open it up. What do you think?

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    Why would they plaster over the drywall, rather than finish it like the other parts of the house? It seems to be mud and tape everywhere else, but I honestly have no idea what's under the popcorn ceiling (I'll be removing it Tuesday). The electrician said the same thing, I need an HVAC guy to replace the attic fan. If the existing fan works as it should, is there any reason to assume I need additional electrical work for the new unit?

    Good to know about thee tub, sitting on the subfloor. Whether I keep the tub or not, I'll need to remove it to replace the subfloor, right? I looked for a label on the floor which stated it's material and/or thickness. I couldn't find it, but 1/4" looks to be right. Is there likely anything under there, or will I be looking at the insulation of the downstairs ceiling? If there isn't, I'd be shocked if water didn't damage the ceiling of the unit below. It was pretty clear there was a bit of water damage from the previous owner, and the floor is a bit soft. What's a thin set?
     
  4. Aug 8, 2014 #4

    nealtw

    nealtw

    nealtw

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    Subfloor is the 5/8 or 3/4 plywood nailed to the joists, then the tub went in and then the thin plywood. I'm not possitive but I think they pull that up if tile is going in.

    Thin set is the morter use for tile.

    One bedroom condo, you may get away with just a shower but women and kids like a tub. If you're staying for a while,build for you. If you're thinking of selling build for the market.
     
  5. Aug 8, 2014 #5

    JoeLink

    JoeLink

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    Ok, so I'll definitely have to pull the tub either way. Once I do I'll pull the thin plywood, my guess is I'll be replacing the entire subfloor. I've heard the same thing, for tile I need another type of flooring for the mortar to adhere to.

    It's a two bedroom, but I'm definitely building it for myself. It'll probably become a rental eventually, but it'd be 4-5 years minimum. The place is pretty small for a family, and the location would definitely appeal more to young professionals like myself. I never plan on selling this condo.
     
  6. Aug 8, 2014 #6

    nealtw

    nealtw

    nealtw

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    The 1/4" plywould should not be underthe tub. The subfloor below that will have to be cheked but should be in good shape.
    There are pro tilers here, they should be along with more info.
    Maybe re-post the floor questions in flooring and they will see it.
     
  7. Aug 8, 2014 #7

    JoeLink

    JoeLink

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    Thanks, will do.
     
  8. Aug 9, 2014 #8

    JoeLink

    JoeLink

    JoeLink

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    I removed the tub last night, and began pulling up the subfloor. I've decided I'd like to do a walk-in shower.

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  9. Aug 11, 2014 #9

    JoeLink

    JoeLink

    JoeLink

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    Today I pulled up a piece of the plywood subfloor, and it left me quite confused. I expected to see full length joists, evenly spaced. Is there such a term as 'abstract carpentry'? I was happy to see so much space between my condo and the one below, but surprised there wasn't any insulation. Should I add it? Would it cut down on the noise transmitted from solid floors?

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    Further, this piece of subflooring is under the wall separating the bathroom from one of the bedrooms. I thought the frame of the wall would sit on the actual joists, then the subfloor would butt up against it, but I don't know much about this stuff :no:

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    There's definitely evidence that moisture was there, and the top layer of plywood has separated in two places, but it looks like all of it is solid. I don't see any evidence of any water or rot now. Considering it runs under the wall to the right, is it worth replacing it, or should I just lay my backerboard over it and proceed? I wasn't able to determine if the subfloor also ran under the wall on the left and/or the far wall.
     
  10. Aug 11, 2014 #10

    nealtw

    nealtw

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    The 3/4" plywood subfloor runs under the wall, infact all the floor was laid for the whole condo and then the walls were built. The peice that you removed is a previous repair. The distance from center to center on the fuull height joists should be 16". the other structure below was likely for something in the ceiling below and the addition to that should not be there as that is not part of the floor structure. On new structures all the floor plywood is tongue and grove so that the floor moves as one and a repair like you have would have a block of 2x4 screwed under the joint between the joists. If yoiu do not have tongue and grove you may need something more added or thicker backing board, not sure. See if you can see insulation around the tub drain, it may have been left out during the last repair job.
     
  11. Aug 11, 2014 #11

    JoeLink

    JoeLink

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    Ah, good to know, I've never seen that before. Not surprising, with my limited experience with carpentry :D

    The distance between the two full height joists is around 23", is that odd? I didn't see any tongues or grooves in the plywood flooring. I didn't see insulation around the tub drain.
     

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