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Bathtub spout

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Redmeatryan

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So I notice a leak between the wall and tub spout, I take the tub spout off to investigate and discover a plastic pipe
I can’t get the tub spout back on tight enough to stop the leak I call a plumber and they tell me that the pipe is incorrectly plumbed and needs to be copper or galvanized and not plastic. The only access to the pipe is through the tile or exterior stucco
I just bought the house and the bathroom was remodeled in 2018 with tile I would rather not destroy but going through the stucco sounds worse. Any ideas on how to fix this without tearing into the wall?
 

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Snoonyb

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It looks like the nipple simply threads into a fitting, and should be easily removed.

If not then when they tiled the bathroom, they should have left you a few extra tiles, because things happen.
 

billshack

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You could get a male 1/2 adapter that is glue on plastic. and also get a screw on tub spout . It is very important that the male adapter be perfectly located so that both male and female join together at just the right spot.
 

Snoonyb

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With just the raw pipe protruding, leads me to believe the OP has a MIX-IT faucet, so the spout is held with a set screw and O rings are used to seal it, which have failed.
 

kok328

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I suspect a compression fitting on the end of the pipe.
I'd enlarge the hole but, not bigger than the finish ring, work the crown nut loose and replace the pipe with copper using a new compression feral and nut.
 

zannej

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I don't think there is a way to replace the CPVC pipe without making a larger opening in the wall/tile. However, they do sell escutcheons for tub spouts to cover up larger gaps. CPVC can get brittle with age. It's also easier to break than copper (obviously). It can crack/snap if someone puts pressure on the tub spout (like a child using it as leverage to stand up). They sell push-fit adapters that slide over copper, CPVC, etc to make a connection, but they allow for twisting/movement. Some of the big box stores sell a copper elbow with push fit adapter on the end. If you can stabilize it so it doesn't move side to side, it could work without having to sweat copper.
 
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