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Bathtub walls

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Estpaul

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Hi, after don't lots of searching and a few opinions I'm more confused then when I started. Quick info, I'm re modeling a bathroom due to toilet leak. The house was built in 1956. The walls are 1/4'' gypsum bored with plaster on top making them 3/4'' thick.

Now getting to the batbtub is where I'm confused. I'm going to be putting in a corian solid surface wall kit. I was going to just demo the walls and start over with new cement board. I discovered the tiles came off fairly easy and seemed to be glued on. I quickly cleared the walls.

I was thinking about scraping the walls to get a flush surface to adhere the corian. I inspected around the faucet and the walls seem to be very thick cement with wire mesh in it. Another reason I wasn't excited to tear it out. I had a few remodelers tell me that I'd have to cut up a foot or 2 and at least replace that because there's most likely mold behind the walls with how they look.

To me it looks like back in the day because there probably wasnt a shower they only tiled 2 feet up and finished the rest of the wall. I pulled the access panel and from the little I could see it looked like there were some water stations but no mold or the smell of mold/mildew. Can anyone give me any suggestions please. This is my first remodel and I'm trying to do what I can. Thanks



 

Snoonyb

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I don't think you have a moisture or mold problem, based upon the color. It appears to me that there was an additive to the cement, such as luminite, which extends the work time.

Your first concern should be if the walls are flat and plumb, from the tub flood rim up.

DUPONT CORIAN, looks like marble, but works like wood, so some wall imperfections can be easily overcome.

Have you given any thought to upgrading the tub/shower valve?
 

Estpaul

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I don't think you have a moisture or mold problem, based upon the color. It appears to me that there was an additive to the cement, such as luminite, which extends the work time.

Your first concern should be if the walls are flat and plumb, from the tub flood rim up.

DUPONT CORIAN, looks like marble, but works like wood, so some wall imperfections can be easily overcome.

Have you given any thought to upgrading the tub/shower valve?
That's what I was thinking too. The walls in one spot around the tub flood rim looked slightly bowed but I dunno if it was just my eyes or not. I was going to scrape some glue off and check with a level.

Yes I definatly want to update the valve to a one handle, I'm pretty good at sweating copper, but haven't done a shower valve yet. Also the pupe running up to the shower ear is the old galvanized, so that definatly needs replaced too. I removed old galvanized under the kitchen sink when I moved in and it was almost clogged shut, I'm sure the bathroom isn't too far off.
 

Snoonyb

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If you need to do some filling, because CORIAN is not porous you won't need an augmented or vinyl add-mix.

You'll find valves which al all solder, and those that have unions included. Try not to solder near the valve, without completely disassembling it.

Just as a point of information, because your shower diverter, is the tub filler spout, instead of in the valve itself, the shower head riser will drain.

Which doesn't make it any easier the change to copper or PEX.
 

Estpaul

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If you need to do some filling, because CORIAN is not porous you won't need an augmented or vinyl add-mix.

You'll find valves which al all solder, and those that have unions included. Try not to solder near the valve, without completely disassembling it.

Just as a point of information, because your shower diverter, is the tub filler spout, instead of in the valve itself, the shower head riser will drain.

Which doesn't make it any easier the change to copper or PEX.
Well since there's copper supply lines already running to the old valve that will make it a little easier. I'm thinking though that I'll have to open a hole at the drop ear elbow to replace that and open a new hole to mount the new valve higher. I'm wondering though if i shouldn't just cut out about a foot wide section from the tub up to drop ear elbow to make it easier, but then more area to patch.
 

Estpaul

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Snoonyb which brings me to the next issue. The sidewall I'm repairing next to tub I was going to hang 1/4'" drywall, then 1/2'' drywall over that instead of shimming studs. But that creates the problem of the top layer of plaster was feathered out at the corner bead.

If I try to hang the 1/2'' drywall over that corner bead there will be a huge bump but if i slide the drywall more to the left and feather the rest in I'm worried it will be too much feathering surface and crack/weak.

Sorry I don't know a ton this is my first house and learning as I go.
 

Snoonyb

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You have a couple of alternatives, cut the metal with and angle grinder, at the half-moon, or, what I would do, lift the nail tabs enough to allow 5/8" WR board to be hung vertically and slid behind them. Hold the drywall 1/2" above the tub flood rim and after the corner-bead is nailed, apply fiberglass tape over the joint.
 

Estpaul

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You have a couple of alternatives, cut the metal with and angle grinder, at the half-moon, or, what I would do, lift the nail tabs enough to allow 5/8" WR board to be hung vertically and slid behind them. Hold the drywall 1/2" above the tub flood rim and after the corner-bead is nailed, apply fiberglass tape over the joint.
Got it. As far as the seams when I hang the new drywall should I use plaster washers on the old walls by the seams to make sure they're secure or just drive the drywall screws through since I obviously don't know how far apart they used fasteners on the studs.
 

Snoonyb

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The use of plaster washers is up to you, I do not, I remove all damaged and loosen product.

Just install a fastener on both side of any joint and you should be fine.

Don't forget the DOTTIE plates where the plumbing transitions a framing member.

Looks good so far.
 

Estpaul

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The use of plaster washers is up to you, I do not, I remove all damaged and loosen product.

Just install a fastener on both side of any joint and you should be fine.

Don't forget the DOTTIE plates where the plumbing transitions a framing member.

Looks good so far.
Those plates are already installed check. Hopefully I can get the drywall on in the next week so I can cut and lay my plywood down.
 

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