Battery Powered Nailers

Discussion in 'Tools' started by Hoytcrx32, Feb 21, 2019.

Help Support House Repair Talk by donating:

  1. Feb 21, 2019 #1

    Hoytcrx32

    Hoytcrx32

    Hoytcrx32

    New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2019
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Coshocton
    I am looking to purchase two nailers. One for doing trim work and paneling in my house and one for framing, Plywood, two by fours, door frames, pre-hung doors, etc. What do you all recommend? Of course I would like good ones but ones that are good at a reasonable cost.

    I don’t know if they make them that do both.

    Thanks!!
     
  2. Feb 21, 2019 #2

    Sparky617

    Sparky617

    Sparky617

    Member

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2014
    Messages:
    1,079
    Likes Received:
    379
    I'm not seeing any cordless framing nailers. Mostly brad and crown staplers in the cordless category. What I did was get a kit with the compressor and a trim nailer and then bought a framing nailer. If you don't already have a compressor, what are you waiting for? That is a great tool to have around the house for many things besides driving nails. Buy a long hose so you can park it outside of your work area and not have to listen to it cycle on and off all day.

    I have two finish nailers, a crown stapler and a framing nailer. The big box stores normally have some nice package deals around the holidays.

    https://www.factoryauthorizedoutlet...-tools/nailers-staplers?cordless_corded=13992
     
    joecaption likes this.
  3. Feb 21, 2019 #3

    bud16415

    bud16415

    bud16415

    Fixer Upper Staff Member Admin Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2013
    Messages:
    5,130
    Likes Received:
    1,813
    Location:
    Erie, PA
  4. Feb 21, 2019 #4

    Sparky617

    Sparky617

    Sparky617

    Member

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2014
    Messages:
    1,079
    Likes Received:
    379
    Not really "battery powered" and for a DIYer pretty pricy way ($400) to get rid of a hose. You need a fuel cell to run it in addition to a battery. The fuel cells add to the operating cost, $18/1000 nails. He was asking for a battery powered nailer, not just cordless.
     
    joecaption likes this.
  5. Feb 21, 2019 #5

    oldognewtrick

    oldognewtrick

    oldognewtrick

    Administrator Staff Member Admin Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2009
    Messages:
    11,139
    Likes Received:
    1,580
    Location:
    Nashville, TN
  6. Feb 22, 2019 #6

    Snoonyb

    Snoonyb

    Snoonyb

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2006
    Messages:
    3,538
    Likes Received:
    661
    I have had and used and sold compressor driven, as wells fuel cell, framing and finish nailers, and I have transitioned to strictly battery operated framing and finish nailers, because you just need a charged battery and nails.

    They are extremely convenient for small projects, but not for large and extensive production projects, then fuel and/or compressor driven are more suitable.
     
  7. Feb 22, 2019 #7

    bud16415

    bud16415

    bud16415

    Fixer Upper Staff Member Admin Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2013
    Messages:
    5,130
    Likes Received:
    1,813
    Location:
    Erie, PA
    You could be correct we have no idea how much the home owner will be using the tool. Quite a few years ago my nephew was building a house with my help full 2 story. He bought a Paslode framing gun with the intention of selling it after the one job. It worked great and was cost effective and when time came to sell it he said no way that he would keep it around for use now and then.


    I haven’t used a battery powered except for small gage trim work so I can’t comment on framing.


    Actually being a home owner and active DIYer I do 100% of all my framing work for the last 10 years with screws. I know some of the framers here disagree but IMO screws outperform nails in framing. They are quite a bit more expensive but for home use you are not using enough to make a difference. They are also slower to put in but again putting in a door jam that’s not an issue. They are a lot easier to take apart when you need to.
     
  8. Feb 22, 2019 #8

    Sparky617

    Sparky617

    Sparky617

    Member

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2014
    Messages:
    1,079
    Likes Received:
    379
    I'm not a contractor but I do a fair amount of building for myself and as a volunteer. I can't justify the cost of a $400 battery-powered framing nailer. The pneumatic stuff is much cheaper and I got a bonus of having an air compressor around for blowing off my tools and inflating tires. If I were a contractor and buying new I'd probably look at battery tools as not trailing along an air hose or extension cord is pretty nice. Certain tools I find battery-powered ones just aren't up to the task. I have a battery powered sawz-all that I will only use when I don't have power. My small battery-powered circular saw is handy for a few cuts, but if I have a lot of cutting to do I want a corded one. Corded hammer drills win over the best of the cordless ones. Cordless drivers, my new favorite tool, are the bomb, much better than using a cordless drill to drive screws.

    Your nephew made a good choice. If you need a tool for more than a few days buying and selling it used can be much cheaper than renting. I've heard you can find deals on tools at pawn shops, especially when the building economy is in a slump and laborers need to get some cash. I haven't done that.
     
  9. Feb 23, 2019 #9

    Snoonyb

    Snoonyb

    Snoonyb

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2006
    Messages:
    3,538
    Likes Received:
    661
    The down side to PASLODE is the specific source of fasteners. The HITACHI, both compressor and fuel models, will drive anybodies fastener, other than PASLODE.
     
    bud16415 likes this.
  10. Feb 23, 2019 #10

    Sparky617

    Sparky617

    Sparky617

    Member

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2014
    Messages:
    1,079
    Likes Received:
    379
    Good point, personally I never want to be tied to a specific brand of consumable items. You become hostage to the manufacturer.
     
  11. Feb 23, 2019 #11

    bud16415

    bud16415

    bud16415

    Fixer Upper Staff Member Admin Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2013
    Messages:
    5,130
    Likes Received:
    1,813
    Location:
    Erie, PA
    Great point and in my experience my nephew was buying the ammo so I didn’t pay any attention.
     
  12. Mar 7, 2019 #12

    billshack

    billshack

    billshack

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2017
    Messages:
    82
    Likes Received:
    18
    i would use a small nailer for moldings, trim work ect. i would not use a big nailer for framing, i have seen too many accidents, in fact most pros do not use them and if i was on a job where they were being used i would walk off. i remember one guy that shot a nail through his foot. and other time some guys were building a wall on the floor and missed with a second nail so that the lip caught on a 2x4 but the nail did not, i flew across the room and hit a guy next to me.
     
  13. Apr 6, 2019 #13

    thebuilder20

    thebuilder20

    thebuilder20

    Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2019
    Messages:
    33
    Likes Received:
    12
    Location:
    UK
    I've had the DeWalt 18v gasless first fix for over 3 years now and it has never missed a beat, granted I no longer use it for full trade use just weekend jobs and personal big projects but this is beyond a good nailer.
    no worries with warming up gas in your jacket etc and this will put a 90mm nail through anything (even block work however I would not recommend just in case as this was a total accident by my father in law who is on the simple side at best bless him)
    if you have the Dewalt kit XR stuff already then its a no brainer as you just get a base unit and if you don't then its a good starting point (I've almost got the full kit of all XR tools and can do any form of woodworking job in the middle of a filed no issue's)
    the gun will fire anything from 50mm to 90mm so you can use for close boards (50mm ring shank nails are best, firm-hold from eBay are brilliant for the money) then there 90mm nails are perfect for a first fixing when doing stud / framing work to assemble things first before you screw or plate etc like a deck frame or pergola (even a roof for a flat which is why i purchased mine as i built a second house in the garden from scratch for our eldest to move out into )
     

Share This Page