Bedroom Ceiling problem

Discussion in 'Walls and Ceilings' started by slingxshot, Jul 30, 2013.

  1. Jul 30, 2013 #1

    slingxshot

    slingxshot

    slingxshot

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    My house is a cape so the 2nd floor has Inclined Ceilings. I noticed that when it rains a lot the ceiling bubbles, like a thin layer pops out. Then when it gets dry it all goes away. The house is from 1951, I don't know when that ceiling was installed, it could have been in the 60's. So I was thinking I install my paint guy to install a thin layer of drywall on top of it?

    I would replace it, however I recently had blown in insulation in the attic space (above the ceiling). So I can't remove it.

    Thanks!
     
  2. Jul 30, 2013 #2

    oldognewtrick

    oldognewtrick

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    I would suggest that you first identify the cause of the bubblying before you spend any money or time with the ceiling. The cart needs to be in front of the horse thing.

    Oh, and :welcome: to House Repair Talk!
     
  3. Jul 30, 2013 #3

    Drywallinfo

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    Sounds like a very small leak to me. A few drips to dampen things up. Then it dries and shrinks back in. What you might want to do is cut a small hole where the bubbling occurs next time and see what the back of that drywall looks like. You can then patch this up.
     
  4. Jul 30, 2013 #4

    kok328

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    Sounds like you have a roof leak. The latex paint will create a bubble. Sort of like a water baloon. Next time, get a bucket and pop the bubble and see how much water comes out.
     
  5. Jul 30, 2013 #5

    Jungle

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    Sounds weird, what's your ceiling made of now?
     
  6. Jul 31, 2013 #6

    Drywallinfo

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    If it is a leak, then the leak will probably get worse, not better. And if you cover it all up, you risk trapping moisture even more so and creating a mold sanctuary. In fact I would guess that you may already have a mold problem if that insulation is all wet above it. Before you do anything, you need to find and fix the leak, if there is one. Then remove any wet insulation or other building materials, clean things up, and then patch things up. Then, after doing all this, if the ceiling is all messed up, you might have another layer of drywall installed over the top, just to make sure you have a good surface to paint.
     
  7. Jul 31, 2013 #7

    slingxshot

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    I did that on a rainy day. The drywall was pretty clean (the drill hole),it has hard and the insulation was dry. I think its the overall moister level in the attic. Thought the other side of the house it doesn't happen. My guess is there is not enough air flow in that area....
     
  8. Aug 1, 2013 #8

    DFBonnett

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    By any chance is there plastic over the insulation in the attic?
     
  9. Aug 1, 2013 #9

    Drywallinfo

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    Any way to get in from the top to look things over? It is possible that your hole missed the water. Or perhaps only the top of the insulation is damp or wet, not the drywall. If you do not have an attic access panel, you might consider putting one in. As much as I HATE going up in my attic, I have to go up there on occasion for light wiring, fan wiring, or insulation.

    Ideally, you could get up there during the next big rain to see first hand what is going on. Rain should not be causing this, unless it is leaking through somehow.
     
  10. Aug 1, 2013 #10

    kok328

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    Roof leaks can be tricky to locate. The leak could be several feet away from where you see it in on the ceiling. Getting into the attic during a heavy rain will reveal alot.
     
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  11. Aug 2, 2013 #11

    nealtw

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    This is especially true when there is a vapour barrier above the drywall. Water can get to the vapour barrier and then run to the low spot maybe in the center of the room if the ceiling sag or the edge of the ceiling if the joists are crowned up, once it finds a screw hole or some path to get thru it can still travel some distance between the vapour barrier and the drywall.
     

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