Best way to seal off toilet pipe

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AprilMoss

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My husband is pretty handy, but we're stumped on exactly what to do. We want to remove the toilet in my son's bathroom. That seems straight-forward enough, but how do we remove or seal off the drain pipe that's left over after the toilet is out?
 

AprilMoss

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Well 1st, what are your intended use for the room?
The room remains a "bath" room, sink and tub, but we were planning on rearranging the space where the toilet is and part of the existing vanity to make a changing table. He won't need the toilet after next week.
 

jcar932

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The kind that fit down in the pipe are a good solution. Make sure you get the right size, they come in both 3" and 4" formats (you have to measure the pipe, for a few hours you can just stuff a rag in the hole to keep the gases out). Unless you're going to redo the floor, this is probably the best solution as it makes it easy to put a toilet back there when he gets potty trained (or you decide to sell the house).
 

jcar932

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Once you pull the toilet (the two nuts on either side), you'll find it mates to what is called a "closet flange." This should be set fairly close to the floor level (usually protrudes a slight amount). To remove that completely is going to take some work. If you can get to the floor below (like a basement), you can just cut it off below the floor. Otherwise, you're going to have to cut away some subfloor, remove the flange from the top, and replace the subfloor. Either way it's pretty involved, and while reversible, not particularly easy. The "repair plug" that was mentioned above is a much better idea.
 
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Eddie_T

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I rented a house that had a space in the basement for a future bathroom. It was merely sealed with duct tape.
 

billshack

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i would suggest that seal it off 100% ,rats can come up the pipe. if it is a lead stub i would install a rag as far back as i can down the pipe, fill the pipe well below the floor with concrete , and then hammer the lead over it then fill the opening with concrete.
 

Eddie_T

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i would suggest that seal it off 100% ,rats can come up the pipe. if it is a lead stub i would install a rag as far back as i can down the pipe, fill the pipe well below the floor with concrete , and then hammer the lead over it then fill the opening with concrete.
With modern sewer system I am having difficulty visualizing how rats might get into the pipe.
 

bud16415

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General thread cleanup. We all need to stick to Home Improvement topics.
 

billshack

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With modern sewer system I am having difficulty visualizing how rats might get into the pipe.
rats are in every sewer system of any large city , garburators provide them with a good source of food . i have had to fight them off my self .
Rats can take up residence anywhere, even in out of city drain systems. That means that rats can live within the piping of your residential sewer system; giving them access to your home. Drain pipes offer rats everything they need to survive: protection, warmth, food remnants and even unsanitary materials.
 

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