Best way to secure large amounts of drywall in my truck?

Discussion in 'General Home Improvement Discussion' started by farmerjohn1324, Jan 9, 2018.

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  1. Jan 9, 2018 #1

    farmerjohn1324

    farmerjohn1324

    farmerjohn1324

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    It is a 1997 Ford Ranger. Neither wide enough nor long enough to fit 4x8.

    I bought a ratchet tie down, but not sure how to use it.

    I took 3 sheets of greenboard today and secured it with twine, but that might not work for 10-20 sheets. The twine probably wasn't even necessary for 3 sheets. I just don't want something bad to happen if I have 10-20 back there.

    0108181749.jpg
     
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2018
  2. Jan 9, 2018 #2

    nealtw

    nealtw

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    Nail 2 2x4s together in an L shape so you can put that over the tops edges and pull with out breaking the edges.
    One strap from near front to near back will stop it from lifting in the wind.
    Your biggest fear a little bump and everything slides out the back.
     
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  3. Jan 9, 2018 #3

    farmerjohn1324

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    I can't visualize that.
     
  4. Jan 9, 2018 #4

    nealtw

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    You crawl under the truck just behind the passenger door and hook the strap to the frame of the truck making sure you don't snag a break line or exhaust pipe pull the outer end out over the load and under the truck near thew back of the drivers side.
    If you tighten it up, it will smash the corners of the drywall so you build something to protect that edge.
     
  5. Jan 9, 2018 #5

    Gary

    Gary

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    Do you have a sheet of plywood or other rigid substrate you can put in the truck first? That would protect the drywall from sharp or pointed edges on the truck and help hold the sheetrock flat so it's less apt to get damaged. I do that all the time hauling signs, seems to work well. I use one sheet on the bottom and one on top, so I can throw a step ladder on top without damaging the signs. Then I strap the step ladder down with rachet straps which holds the sheets in place. My sheets of plywood are just old signs that get thrown away once they get too beat up to use.


    A friend of mine has a Ford Ranger and he built a wood frame for the floor of the truck box out of 2''x4''s, or whatever you have handy, built up to the same height as the wheel wells. The box is wide enough above the wheel wells to lay the sheets flat. They hang out the back (with tailgate down), but you can run your strap around the back of the drywall sheets and tie it to the box, anchoring to the tailgate latch brackets. The wood frame just sets in the box and the wheel wells keep it there. Take it out when you don't need it. if the drywall hangs out too far and your worried about damage if the truck hits a bump, put the sheet of plywood in first for support.
     
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2018
  6. Jan 9, 2018 #6

    farmerjohn1324

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    What do I build to protect that edge?
     
  7. Jan 9, 2018 #7

    nealtw

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    nail 2 2x4 together length ways in an L shape

    L.jpg
     
  8. Jan 9, 2018 #8

    oldognewtrick

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    What about having the store deliver...just a thought.
     
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  9. Jan 9, 2018 #9

    Sparky617

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    It may be worth a look at having the store deliver it. If you're buying enough go check with a drywall supplier rather than a big box store. You may be able to go with 12-foot sheets to reduce seams. A regular bed Ranger can handle 4' sheet goods, your step-side can't. With the standard bed you put in 2x6's in slots in the bed to raise it up over the wheel wells.
     
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  10. Jan 9, 2018 #10

    bud16415

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    Check with your local spring replacement shop before you put 20 sheets in and make sure they have the parts you will need.

    I would suggest letting the builders center deliver as mentioned or borrow a full size truck. You want the sheets flat, smooth and dry without the corners and edges nicked up.

    Now do it however you think is best.
     
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  11. Jan 9, 2018 #11

    Snoonyb

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    Build a 2X4 rectangle to fit the front of the box, 3" higher than the box, screw 3-2X4X10's with a cleat inside the tailgate, load the board, tie it off, flag it and drive away.
     
  12. Jan 9, 2018 #12

    Wuzzat?

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    You won't get uplift but they will want to slide sideways as you're turning. Cancel out this force however you can.

    With many sheets, watch out for decreased vehicle stability caused by this heavy load one or two feet above the vehicle's center of gravity.
     

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