Braid Nail size to attach door stop?

Discussion in 'General Home Improvement Discussion' started by Fiero2, Dec 26, 2017.

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  1. Dec 26, 2017 #1

    Fiero2

    Fiero2

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    I have a Ryobi 18g braid nail gun. Looking to install a door stop trim piece to the door frame. Thanks James
     
  2. Dec 27, 2017 #2

    tuffy

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    I'd use at least 1.1/2 that's what I used and it hasn't gone anywhere.
     
  3. Dec 27, 2017 #3

    Snoonyb

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    1-1/2" narrow crown brads for your brad nailer.
     
  4. Dec 27, 2017 #4

    nealtw

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    narrow crown brads????????????:)
     
  5. Dec 27, 2017 #5

    Snoonyb

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    Look at the heads, referred to as the crown of the brad, and you'll find different sizes, in fact cabinet shops use, what is referred to in the trades, as a pin nailer, which reduces the amount of fill needed prior to applying sanding sealers.
     
  6. Dec 27, 2017 #6

    nealtw

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    I have not seen that.:thbup:
     
  7. Jan 8, 2018 #7

    Wuzzat?

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  8. Jan 8, 2018 #8

    nealtw

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  9. Jan 8, 2018 #9

    Wuzzat?

    Wuzzat?

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    Somebody's nailing schedule. . .
    "Nails spaced at 6 inches (152 mm) on center at edges, 12 inches (305 mm) at intermediate supports except 6 inches (152 mm) at all supports where spans are 48 inches (1219 mm) or more. For nailing of wood structural panel and particleboard diaphragms and shear walls, refer to Section 2314.3."

    The recommended nailing schedule here for installing a door stop trim piece to the door frame. . .
    18g
    1-1/2" or longer narrow crown brads
    The spacing, or how many per strip, is still a question. Or just go with your gut.
    It's more complicated for sheet goods like drywall.

    I don't usually fly by the seat of my pants.
    I'd rather have a way to show Due Diligence or Duty of Care, even for projects that I am not being paid for.

    You're welcome. :)
     
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2018
  10. Jan 8, 2018 #10

    nealtw

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    You want people to read all the crap about nailing anything and everything
    until they may or may not get to that little tid bit.

    That is almost as bad as Snoonby telling me that there is a wide crown brad.
     
  11. Jan 8, 2018 #11

    joecaption

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    Brads have no heads and have no holding power.
    May get away with it on a door stop, but Id use finish nails instead.
     
  12. Jan 8, 2018 #12

    nealtw

    nealtw

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    They work fine if you toe nail the brads.
     
  13. Jan 8, 2018 #13

    Snoonyb

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    You were given the method to refute that, yet nothing so far.

    Time will eventually broaden your knowledge, hopefully, if you'll allow it, you may even catch up.
     
  14. Jan 9, 2018 #14

    Gary

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    I've been remodeling rooms here one at a time following the tornado over the past couple years. I've had to pull door trim & baseboard that I originally nailed with a pin nailer. I tried pulling the brads through the trim, but that proved to be more difiult than I had thought. Instead I've been cutting them off flush on the back side with the multitool saw.
    I use the longest pin the nailer will hold for trim work, so they'll reach through the draywall and catch a stud. I needed to use a flat bar to pop the trim off the wall also, to keep from breaking it. For little nails they hold pretty dern good.
     
  15. Jan 9, 2018 #15

    nealtw

    nealtw

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    Post a link to said brads with wide crown.
     
  16. Jan 9, 2018 #16

    nealtw

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    End nippers that are not to sharp will pull the nails with a pry sideways or grab one with a needle nose and roll them up on the nose..
     
  17. Jan 9, 2018 #17

    Gary

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    I tried that and 1/2 the time the brad would snap off. If they'd snapped off at or below the surface, that would have been fine, but that wasn't the case. Rather than fighting it I just buzzed them off.
     
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  18. Jan 9, 2018 #18

    Snoonyb

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    You said you'd never heard of them, so now's your chance.
     
  19. Jan 9, 2018 #19

    Wuzzat?

    Wuzzat?

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    One of the things "I want" is to give people choices as to how deep they want to get into something. Just like Wikipedia.

    BTW, interpreting my behavior ("process commentary") is generally not welcome. Not by kids or adults either.

    Anyway, back to business. . .
    the trick is not to do more work in finding the answer than the OP is willing to do.

    I didn't think the idea of a thing called a nailing schedule is so radical. My bad! :p
     
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2018
  20. Jan 9, 2018 #20

    Wuzzat?

    Wuzzat?

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    Normally, the person who makes the allegation (wide crown brads exist) bears the burden of proof,
    "maxim semper necessitas probandi incumbit ei qui agit"
    but in this case Mr. w is behaving badly.

    OK.

    Hint: The site that shows this rhymes with "ranger" but I will say choosing your search terms is very important; where you put the quotes, etc..
    Due diligence.

    And I just did more work in finding the answer than Mr. w is willing to do.
     
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2018

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