Brick wall that I want to paint over

Discussion in 'Walls and Ceilings' started by marrzard, Oct 12, 2016.

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  1. Oct 12, 2016 #1

    marrzard

    marrzard

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    Hi all! Not sure where to turn or go to for this unique project, but basically I have a brick wall in our office loft unit that we wanted to cover with chalk paint.

    Wondering what kind of material I can cover the brick wall with so that I can paint it? Foam core? Wood? Something else?

    Any advice/help would be greatly appreciated.:):)

    Picture of the area below...

    IMG_3581.jpg
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 13, 2016
  2. Oct 12, 2016 #2

    nealtw

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    Welcome to the site.
    Do you own the building or are you allowed to make changes?
    Are they outside walls and if yes is the brick the exterior of the building?
     
  3. Oct 12, 2016 #3

    marrzard

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    We are renting but allowed to make changes if they aren't structurally invasive.

    Interior of the building behind a desk, so it doesn't have to be perfect.
     
  4. Oct 12, 2016 #4

    Snoonyb

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    It looks more like block than brick, however, any "covering" will change the architecture in a manner different than painting.
     
  5. Oct 12, 2016 #5

    slownsteady

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    If approved by the owner, aluminum stud wall covered with drywall. paint of your choosing.
    If not approved, some large-ish partition wall sold by many office furniture companies (a.k.a cubicle stuff)
     
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  6. Oct 13, 2016 #6

    beachguy005

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    Why not just clean off some of those mortar joints and paint it as it is. I think the block wall is an interesting texture painted.
     
  7. Oct 13, 2016 #7

    Sparky617

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    Agree with one correction. All the metal studs I've used are galvanized steel not aluminum. There would be no reason to make the studs out of aluminum versus steel. Steel is much cheaper and weight isn't an issue, the main reason for substituting aluminum for steel. You can't stack enough steel studs up on a trailer to come close to being overweight for shipping. I have a torpedo level I used all the time while working with steel studs. It has a magnet on one side which comes in really handy when plumbing the studs.
     
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  8. Oct 13, 2016 #8

    slownsteady

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    Yup, should have said steel. My bad.

    Beachguy is right though. You can just paint it. Or if you don't like the texture of painted block, trowel on a coat of mud first.
     
    Last edited: Oct 13, 2016
  9. Oct 13, 2016 #9

    kok328

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    a large classroom style chalk board hung on the wall would be the easiest, quickest and cheapest way to go.
     
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  10. Oct 13, 2016 #10

    Sparky617

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    Chalkboard paint is kind of a 2000 thing, I hear it has gone out of style. Anyway, it would really wear down your chalk on rough brick and wouldn't erase very well. If the thought is to use it as a chalkboard you'd want something smoother.

    The steel stud idea has the advantage of being pretty non-touch to the structure. You could do several furring strips but they'd need to be fastened to the brick. I made a bike rack years ago that I had in a townhouse that didn't need any attachment to the house. It was a friction fit with adjustable bolts to tighten it up between the floor and the ceiling. Something like that would be totally no-damage to the structure.
     
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  11. Oct 14, 2016 #11
  12. Oct 14, 2016 #12

    Sparky617

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    Chris,
    Wouldn't those be pretty permanent? How about just using wallpaper under-liner and painting that? That could probably be stripped off easier.
     
  13. Oct 14, 2016 #13

    nealtw

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    The OP has not been back so it was likely just a passing thought.
    But if they are coming back and reading this stuff.
    If the block is the exterior of the building in a cooler climate moisture will wick thru the block, so anything stuck on the wall will stop the moisture and cause problems .
    So what ever is done has to allow are flow around it or completely sealed and insulated to stop the wicking.
     
  14. Oct 14, 2016 #14

    kok328

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    Ok so hang a chalkboard but install some standoffs for air flow.
     
  15. Oct 14, 2016 #15

    nealtw

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    I like the idea of a panel with adjustable legs top and bottom.
     
  16. Oct 14, 2016 #16

    nealtw

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    See how this is spaced away from the wall.

    bb.jpg
     
  17. Oct 15, 2016 #17

    slownsteady

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    Op mentioned interior wall i think
     
  18. Oct 15, 2016 #18

    nealtw

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    I missed that post, glue up sheets of mdf, trim and paint or paint and trim.
     
  19. Oct 15, 2016 #19

    chrisn

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    It would certainly be easier and less expensive. You would probably have to do 2 layers and cross-hatch them to cover the cinder block seams.
     

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