Camper potable tank for well tank?

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum' started by mechanicalmonster, Dec 7, 2009.

  1. Dec 7, 2009 #1

    mechanicalmonster

    mechanicalmonster

    mechanicalmonster

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    I plan to hook up a pump on my shallow well soon for outside watering purposes. I have a good potable water tank I pulled from a 30 foot camping trailer. Is there any reason I can't use this as a pressure tank?
     
  2. Dec 7, 2009 #2

    travelover

    travelover

    travelover

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    You need to confirm how much pressure it is rated for and how much pressure the pump could provide, to be on the safe side.
     
  3. Dec 7, 2009 #3

    Speedbump

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    Some tanks on campers are used strictly for storage but not under pressure. Some actually hold pressure. Problem is, they are not meant to be used with a water pump. They will waterlog.

    If your using this pump strictly for irrigation, what makes you think you need a pressure tank?
     
  4. Dec 7, 2009 #4

    mechanicalmonster

    mechanicalmonster

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    Thanks that is the kind of info I am looking for. This tank does have the valve stem for air fwiw.

    I know very little about a well so I thought they all needed some type of tank. I know almost nothing about a well set up. I have seen some of the older people use old water heater tanks years ago. I assume it was just storage.
     
  5. Dec 8, 2009 #5

    Speedbump

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    To simplify things a bit: If you don't mind turning the sprinklers on and off manually with a switch or using a sprinkler timer with a pump start relay, you won't need a tank.

    Now if you want to be able to open a valve somewhere and have water come out of that valve, you will need a tank and a pressure switch. If you would like to learn more than you ever imagined about pumps and tanks, you can click on the link at the bottom of this page which will take you to my FAQ page. It answers a lot of questions like these.
     
  6. Dec 8, 2009 #6

    mechanicalmonster

    mechanicalmonster

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    Thanks. I have been learning alot from your link.
     

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