Can I add an additional 240 line to my full 120 panel?

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lorrireynolds

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Our house is 113 years old. We have a 100 amp panel that is full. All of our appliances are natural gas (except fridge). We want to make changes to head away from natural gas and switch to electric. We want to have our HVAC changed to a heat pump with individual units. We also want to add a mother-in-law unit in our basement and car charger for our future elect. vehicle.

So my question:
- Can we keep the old panel for the new unit and move the existing wiring of our main house to a new panel?
 

afjes_2016

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I think others would agree with me.

The question you ask is difficult to give you a clear cut yes or no with the information that you have provided. Meaning, we really don't have any power information in the way of the appliances etc that you plan on using electric to power.

With your proposed move to all electric from gas I would highly recommend that you contact a few licensed/insured electricians and go over with them your overall plan to switch to all electric. They will do a "load calculation" to determine what you will need in the way of power for your plans. This is the very first step that must be done before even doing any work.

A lot may depend on the type of wiring in your 113 year old home now. Any existing Knob and Tube? Has any of it been rewired?

Get an itemized list/proposal from at least 3 different electricians. Let them educate you (you read up on it on the side to help yourself out). This is the best place to start. Also, remember, going with the least expensive bid is not always the best choice.

Sorry that I can't give you a more direct answer to your question.
 

BuzzLOL

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Our house is 113 years old. We have a 100 amp panel that is full. All of our appliances are natural gas (except fridge). We want to make changes to head away from natural gas and switch to electric.
Depending on electrical upgrades over the years, your wiring coming in may only be for 60 amps, the box may be fuses or circuit breakers, and you will probably need at least a 200 amp box or more. Also, the electric company's transformer feeding your house and neighbors' houses may need to be looked at to see what its capacity is and how many houses it is feeding... can it handle any more?
Is your outdoor wiring above ground or under ground?
If you live in an area that gets cold in winter and has natural gas available, I would stick with gas for heating. Gas is less expensive and you could wear out an expensive heat pump quickly using it for both a lot of heating plus cooling.
If you drive very far, electric vehicles still aren't practical and are also expensive.
 
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