Can I not do a pocket joint with this Kreg?

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dborns

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I bought a Kreg Jig, (model 310 I believe), and the directions are lacking. I can’t tell how to do a butt jig with this. I’m building frames and using 1x4’s.
The jig has a small grey adjuster that I can see how that works for other joints, but I can’t tell how, or if I can, adjust the jig for a flat(?) butt joint?
There’s got to be a way, but maybe this jig won’t work?BEE73538-4081-4AD1-983D-FDFDC343F039.jpeg456B0CFA-D9CB-46FF-AF1E-30C130D0A39D.jpeg7201386C-F51E-4E34-9D0C-B153788333E5.jpeg
 

dborns

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Disregard. It just didn’t look right, but it looks like it’s correct. It just looked to far back. I’ll try a crap piece.573C2776-BF12-42BB-921B-D0F7F98ED59A.jpeg
 

havasu

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Kregs are cool. Too bad they need their own screws
 

Eddie_T

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Your layout looks like you're about to drill the wrong piece. You drill the end grain piece so the screw will go into straight grain. Trying the spacing on a piece of scrap is a good idea. I have the original which is designed for only 1x stock so no adjustment other than depth. You can probably find instructions on Kreg site or youtube.0329211310.jpgKreg.jpg
 
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Eddie_T

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Kregs are cool. Too bad they need their own screws
I have used other screws but washer head is best. Lowes carries Kreg and I think Hillman pocket screws.

Interesting, when I look at the picture above I noticed that I had not snugged the screws, they are now.
 
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Spicoli43

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Kreg's screws and bits are atrocious, like they planned them to disintegrate like they do. Makita makes MUCH better bits.
 

mabloodhound

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Eddie is correct. Drill the piece "with" the grain so the screws will attach to the other piece "across" the grain. I buy my screws from McFeely and yes, they must be flat bottom, otherwise a tapered screw might split the wood.
 

dborns

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Yep, I messed up and drilled them on the wrong piece. I started noticing some of the screws wound bottom out, but weren’t tightening. I then looked into it online, and read about not screwing into end grain as it’s not as strong? I did use gorilla adhesive on each joint, but I’m going to try to back the screws out and I’ll clamp the jig on the correct piece by taking the depth guide off and see if I can drill new holes.
It’s important because these are going on heavy mirrors, and the hanging hardware will be on the horizontal pieces.
Which brings me to my next question...
 

dborns

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How would you attach these frames to a mirror? My initial thought was to use the same gorilla adhesive, and put a bunch on all the way around. The top and bottom of the mirror are 265AD0D9-8B4F-45C4-AB61-A993274E28C5.jpeg63DC3B47-F3BA-4087-9969-F556DE9EC3B9.jpegflush with the edges of the frame, but there’s about 1 1/2” of frame proud of the mirror on the sides to allow for the hanging hardware.
Using that gorilla glue would bond that frame pieces and mirror together making it one sturdy piece I would think. And then I wouldn’t have to worry about redrilling new pocket holes, or is that a recommendation?
 

Eddie_T

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I wish the Kreg Jig had been available when I built my kitchen. I built face frames using glued cleats behind joints. I saw it demonstrated at the Atlanta Woodworking Show in the early 90s and ought mine soon after. My only complaint is that the original does only 1" stock or ½" stock by using a spacer. For occasional 2x4 joinery I can clamp on a piece of scrap with a predrilled pocket hole to serve as a guide.
 

Eddie_T

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I don't know, I haven't tried gluing glass to wood, expansion would be different.
 

Flyover

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How heavy are these mirrors?

I used crown moulding to make a frame around a large bathroom mirror once, and found it was much too flimsy to support the weight of the mirror. I ended up connecting the top and bottom horizontal pieces together with one big piece of 1/4" plywood, which then took the weight of the mirror. I mounted the plywood on the wall by installing one of those sawtooth picture hangers on the back of it and hanging the whole thing on a nail or screw driven into a stud.

Edit: I think @Eddie_T 's mirror clips are probably the best way to go, so long as your frame is strong enough to support the mirror.
 

zannej

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I wish I could ask my dad how he adhered the mirrors on his desk to the wood framing. I believe he used a plywood backer and glued the mirror up then put frame around but I didn't watch him do it. Shame because the mirrors were my suggestion so his desk wouldn't feel so cramped and dark. He loved the effect.

There is a brand called Armor that used to lend other companies their patents. Kreg was allowed to make the clamps from their patent for many years but they are no longer allowed to use it. Supposedly their jigs are superior to Kreg's but are rather expensive. They have a 350piece screw set with jig for about $152. Screws are color coded by size.
 

Eddie_T

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I framed a large mirror (64"x 35") for a bath when I built the house. I made it with molding cutters on a radial arm saw. The mirror is inset like a picture in a frame. I think I used thin plywood on the corners to hold the mirror in the inset.
0330212301.jpg
 

zannej

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That looks nice, Eddie! I'm planning to frame out a mirror that has a beveled edge & turn it in to the door of a recessed (or partially recessed) medicine cabinet). I bought some trim & have plywood for a backer, but I'm trying to figure out the best way to put it together to hold the mirror in place and then add hinges. It will be heavy so I need sturdy hinges. I'm thinking maybe a continuous hinge plus two soft-close hinges so it will never slam and some sort of magnetic catch.

I sort of have my eye on the Armor pockethole jig. Just the jig is over $130 though & I'm wondering if it is worth it.
 

MrMiz

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dabs of clear silicone adhesive it the corners. They usually have the adhesive kind in the isle with the glass and lexan.
 

dborns

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To those mentioning strength of the wood frame, wouldn’t gluing that glass all around basically make it really strong and one “unit”?
 

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