Can i replace the 2 supports around my post with a simpson t tie?

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ahhben

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In my garage i have two house post, being supported by 3 pieces of 1x6 lumber on each side. I want to take it off to save some. Can I just support the post with only a Simpson T tie?
 

Snoonyb

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Welcome.
Those are a designed structural brace and were it I, I'd ask an engineer.
 

Sparky617

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ok do you happen to know if there are engineer forums? thanks
Don't know of any, but no engineer is going to give you advice over the interwebs for free. Not sure why they added Y bracing to your post, it is one way of bracing a deck post, but I've never seen it on an interior post. How are the Y braces attached to the post and the beam?j What is above your garage? I assume living space.
 

Snoonyb

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No, I do not, but I now that there are often engineers who are forum contributors.

However, any "advice" received on-line, would be circuatist, at best, because of liability.

In your local, I would estimates that there are more than a hundred qualified engineers.

This is a reference I've used, a lot; Commercial Engineers--Consulting in San Francisco Bay Area | The Blue Book Building and Construction Network

What the process I use is to create a dimensioned drawing of the components, IE post, beam, joists, and take it to an office, and ask. Usually there is no charge, for small inquiries.
 
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Eddie_T

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Don't trust me as I am a bit of a rebel but the wye supports appear to be too lightweight to serve as load bearing. Maybe they are to prevent racking. Is the beam joined on top of the post? If the beam is pieced I would prolly try T ties and to verify that there isn't a load problem place a 2x4 post to fit loosely under the beam and check it occasionally (for a couple of weeks) to see if it gets tight.
 

Snoonyb

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Don't know of any, but no engineer is going to give you advice over the interwebs for free. Not sure why they added Y bracing to your post, it is one way of bracing a deck post, but I've never seen it on an interior post. How are the Y braces attached to the post and the beam?j What is above your garage? I assume living space.
Don't trust me as I am a bit of a rebel but the wye supports appear to be too lightweight to serve as load bearing. Maybe they are to prevent racking. Is the beam joined on top of the post? If the beam is pieced I would prolly try T ties and to verify that there isn't a load problem place a 2x4 post to fit loosely under the beam and check it occasionally (for a couple of weeks) to see if it gets tight.
These are seen a lot and where part of the evolution of bracing developed to mitigate permanent deflection as the result of earthquake activity.
 

Snoonyb

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I've seen them with just 3-8D's and 4 or 5 each side of the 3/4 box.
We used to use 2x4's & 16d's for long runs of ridge bracing, which the use of plywood sheating eliminated.
 

ekrig

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These are seen a lot and where part of the evolution of bracing developed to mitigate permanent deflection as the result of earthquake activity.
I think that this is the reason! Diagonal bracing is a common aspect of buildings in areas prone to seismic activity.

Personally, I wouldn't touch them as I doubt there is that much to be gained from pulling them out to warrant the potential risks. If you're still set on doing it, I'd get at least two engineers to vouch for the changes that you planning to do. I'm not a fan of permits and red tape, but I don't take chances when it comes to key structural elements.
 

MrMiz

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For me this is the difference between "can" and "should". You "can" replace it with a T but without thoroughly examining what's above it (their might be load points on either side of the post to consider), if that's a butt joint between 2 joist spans (which I suspect it is), are their other Y's like it in there. So with the information I currently have I can't gauge just how sketchy this could be. So I would suggest that you probably "shouldn't".
Now you get to decide what it means if your standing their looking at it and saying to yourself... "yeah ... I probably shouldn't have"

I would also throw into this that a T doesn't preform the same load function as a Y. So yeah you probably shouldn't.
 
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Snoonyb

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In my practice I wouldn't use a "T", unless specified. My automatic inclination would be here; CC/ECC/ECCU

And a CC66ROT.
 
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