Cape Cod

Discussion in 'Insulation and Radiant Barriers' started by Fitz31, Apr 29, 2014.

  1. Apr 29, 2014 #1

    Fitz31

    Fitz31

    Fitz31

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    I am in the process of buying a Cape and during the inspection I used the inspector's laser thermostat and noticed that there is a 10 degree difference in the first and second floor, in 60s weather. I did some research thinking to add a ridge vent to cool the second floor and found that Capes are famous for being hot on 2nd floor due to lack of inlet ventilation. The only 2 choices to resolve this that I found are cobra fascia inlet vents or smart vents on the 1st layer of shingles, since the Capes do not have eaves for venting. I am leaning on the fascia vents since I can just pull the gutters and 1x6 vs having to pull shingles off a roof that is only 2 years old. Is this a good choice or is there some other way to get inlet flow.

    Also I was thinking to add foam ridge board on the underside of the rafters to allow for a good flow from the inlet to outlet and to insulate the 2nd floor, as from what I read the knee walls can make it hard to get the second floor "tight". Would this work?

    thank you in advance for your thoughts and ideas
     
  2. Apr 29, 2014 #2

    nealtw

    nealtw

    nealtw

    Contractor retired

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    Welcome to the site. Usually you have an air gap between the insulation and the roof sheeting. If you have no vents now, might indicate a closed system where the insulation is up against the sheeting and adding vents will be of no benefit. You might be able to prove it one way or the other if you have access behind the knee wall. Either way the real problem usually is the rafters aren't deep enough to allow alot of insulation. The other fix might be a few inches of foam board on the ceiling and another layer of drywall.
     

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