Ceiling support beam

Discussion in 'Framing and Foundation' started by lambierules, Sep 2, 2013.

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  1. Sep 2, 2013 #1

    lambierules

    lambierules

    lambierules

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    Hello,

    I came across this forum searching about installing a basement support beam. Bought a century home and am re-doing the basement. Our house inspector suggested a beam in the basement to prevent sagging, it is only a single wide lot and was never built with a support beam.

    The dimensions are 15' x 30'. I was thinking about running a beam from the front to back. Any suggestions on what to use for material and how man poles to add would be appreciated.

    I was told 2 2x8's with a layer of particle board in the middle. Do the 2x8's need to be a complete 30' long or made up of pieces.

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  2. Sep 2, 2013 #2

    CallMeVilla

    CallMeVilla

    CallMeVilla

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    Spend a few $$$ for a structural engineer to review the framing. He can determine the weight loads and recommend the proper way to reinforce the celing. Seriously. Then, with some help, you might be able to do much of the work yourself to save $$$ ... knowing you will be doing the right things.

    Here is a helpful introductory article which will give you an overview of the tasks... http://www.familyhandyman.com/floor...epairs-by-sistering-floor-joists/step-by-step

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    Last edited: Sep 2, 2013
  3. Sep 2, 2013 #3

    deckman2

    deckman2

    deckman2

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    The bigger the beam the less support post needed. A doubled up 2x8 is going to require post every 5' or 6'. Whatever you do, don't use particle board in between the boards. Particle board will absorb moisture in the basement & eventually fall apart. Instead use plywood (not osb) glueing & screwing it together.

    When I framed up north where we did basements we used 4 - 2x12's for the beam with metal poles with a turnbuckel for adjustments when needed, don't remember the spacing of the poles tho. Of the hundreds of homes I framed here in Texas only one had a basement and no support beam under the joist were needed as it was framed for use as living quarters.

    Getting an engineer to spec out what you need is good advice.
     
  4. Sep 3, 2013 #4

    nealtw

    nealtw

    nealtw

    Contractor retired

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    Welcome to the site, add support posts wood or steel, may require digging into the floor to add footings. Get that engineer and then come back and get help how best to apply his info.
     

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