Cleaning outdoor light sockets

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dborns

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We have a large outdoor chandelier type light, over our front porch. It is covered, but there is damage to the sockets as far as corrosion and a little rust. I noticed a few of the bulbs were out, so when I removed them I found the corrosion on the bulbs and the sockets today. What’s the best way to clean those sockets to get the corrosion off there? Can I use the electronic connection cleaner that you can buy in a spray can and maybe a brass brush?
I didn’t get a picture of the sockets themselves, but they basically look like the corrosion on the picture attached of the lightbulb.
42260D48-9463-4304-B14D-0ECC6DA53FD1.jpeg 2C1D2279-5D36-4758-96F9-897D0AC87E95.jpeg
 

bud16415

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FluidFilm is a non conductive lube I use for lots of things and I spray it on my car hitch connector for lights. I have never used it on outdoor lights but would think it would work.

Make sure the power is off and then spray some lube in and go at it with a small wire wheel or maybe the wheel first and then some compressed air and then the lube.
 

dborns

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Ok thank you for the suggestions. One more from me, shouldn’t these be exterior use bulbs? They’re just normal LED bulbs, and I know when I replace our large motion light bulbs, I have to get exterior “grade” ones. Like I mentioned, the light is under the front porch cover, but obviously moisture is getting down in there causing the corrosion and one bulb actually had the bottom of it in such bad shape it was broken in the socket.
 

Snoonyb

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I'm not inclined to use an expensive, directed product, but use just standard with the fluid lubes suggested.
 

CallMeChaz

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Ok thank you for the suggestions. One more from me, shouldn’t these be exterior use bulbs? They’re just normal LED bulbs, and I know when I replace our large motion light bulbs, I have to get exterior “grade” ones. Like I mentioned, the light is under the front porch cover, but obviously moisture is getting down in there causing the corrosion and one bulb actually had the bottom of it in such bad shape it was broken in the socket.
Unless the bulbs are directly exposed to weather, standard LED bulbs will suffice. Don't overthink the cleaning process. A small wire brush alone will likely do the trick. Contact cleaner is an overkill, but will certainly help if you already have it on hand. Follow cleaning by any lube rated for electrical contacts or bulbs to mitigate further corrosion.
 
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Skeezix

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FluidFilm is a non conductive lube I use for lots of things and I spray it on my car hitch connector for lights. I have never used it on outdoor lights but would think it would work.

Non-conductive = will not conduct electricity. Unless electricity has changed over the last 75 years...
 

bud16415

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Non-conductive = will not conduct electricity. Unless electricity has changed over the last 75 years...
That's correct and the reason you wouldn't want a conductive lube that would cause shorting. The contact connection wants to be metal on metal and the screw thread action and the tip pressure will provide that. The lube is to remove and prevent corrosion that interferes with the contact.
 

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