Quantcast

Code Question on running new light fixtures with new wiring

Help Support House Repair Talk:

vyacheslav

Active Member
Joined
Sep 20, 2016
Messages
29
Reaction score
3
Greetings,

I will be running new Romex wire to a new dimmer switch and the dimmer switch will control two overhead light fixtures simultaneously (not independently) over a kitchen bar area. New Romex 12 gauge wire (yellow) everywhere (circuit is 20 amp). The Romex for the lights and the switch will be contained in a junction box in the basement joists, with power coming from the circuit breaker. The junction box and the ceiling/switch boxes are all new blue plastic.

Here is my code question:

Since both lights will be controlled together in concert by one dimmer switch, should I connect one light fixture to the other (Fixture A getting its power from Fixture B) and have one piece of Romex going to the junction box to power both, or should each fixture be getting its power directly from the junction box (As opposed to Fixture A getting its power from Fixture B) and have two pieces of Romex going to the junction box to get power (one for each fixture)?

Thanks for your help!

V
 

Snoonyb

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 30, 2006
Messages
4,194
Reaction score
844
A clarification of terminology.

"(Fixture A getting its power from Fixture B)"

Either of the scenarios will work, however, neither "get their power" from each other, because they are both controlled, via a switch leg, from the dimmer.

"and have one piece of Romex going to the junction box to power both"

A hot pair originates from a "J" box in the basement and travels to a switch box where a dimmer will be installed, controlling 2 overhead light fixtures in the kitchen ceiling.

You can wire each fixture separately, which allows for the possibility to expand or to install any number of the variety of alternative fixture configurations available, or you can control them as general illumination, with a single switch.
 

afjes_2016

Established Member
Joined
Aug 28, 2016
Messages
468
Reaction score
222
vyacheslav: Snoonyb gave you pretty good advise.

But I just want to ask one question to be sure that something may need to or not need to change. You mention two light fixtures. I think we are assuming by what you are saying that to turn these lights on there is only one switch and not two or more like a 3way set up? If this is the case things will change.

 

JoeD

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 15, 2006
Messages
1,731
Reaction score
341
Either way is code compliant.
The normal way would be power to switch then switch to fixture A and then fixture A to fixture B.
 

afjes_2016

Established Member
Joined
Aug 28, 2016
Messages
468
Reaction score
222
Yes, JoeD you are correct - I missed the most important part of the question "is it code compliant" not will it work.
 

kok328

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 19, 2007
Messages
3,017
Reaction score
315
Greetings,

I will be running new Romex wire to a new dimmer switch and the dimmer switch will control two overhead light fixtures simultaneously (not independently) over a kitchen bar area. New Romex 12 gauge wire (yellow) everywhere (circuit is 20 amp). The Romex for the lights and the switch will be contained in a junction box in the basement joists, with power coming from the circuit breaker. The junction box and the ceiling/switch boxes are all new blue plastic.

Here is my code question:

Since both lights will be controlled together in concert by one dimmer switch, should I connect one light fixture to the other (Fixture A getting its power from Fixture B) and have one piece of Romex going to the junction box to power both, or should each fixture be getting its power directly from the junction box (As opposed to Fixture A getting its power from Fixture B) and have two pieces of Romex going to the junction box to get power (one for each fixture)?

Thanks for your help!

V
Yes, you plan will work and is code compliant.
If you'd like to save some $, drop down to 14AWG on a 15A breaker. Overkill on a light circuit is a waste of money.
 

SlimSavage

Member
Joined
Dec 11, 2020
Messages
5
Reaction score
1
Location
Sparta, Tennessee
Make sure you get the correct dimmer for the fixtures. If they are LED you need to get an LED compatible dimmer and if they will be chandeliers with a significant amount of bulbs, you may have to get a dimmer with a higher wattage rating. For instance, say you have 30 total incandescent bulbs rated at 45watts each, your basic 600watt dimmer will cause your fixtures to look dim and also cause flicker when you move your dimming lever up or down. So you'd need to go up to a 1500 watt rated dimmer.
Also, LED bulbs don't always work the best on a dimmer. The dimmer switch lowers the voltage output which causes the, already very low rated, LED bulbs to flicker or go off completely.

You may not have any of these scenarios occur but usually at least one will.
 

Latest posts

Top