Combo concrete Lanai Roof and Upstairs Patio crack

Discussion in 'Roofing and Siding' started by TJF, May 6, 2019.

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  1. May 6, 2019 #1

    TJF

    TJF

    TJF

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    Hello!

    First, I want to apologize for the length of this. I like to think I'm a reasonably competent DIYer but this one is out of my wheelhouse so far that I'm not even sure what type of contractor to call for the repair.

    Here's the situation: My patio behind my house has a lanai (roof) covering it that also doubles as the upstairs patio/balcony off the master bedroom. It is wood framed with a plywood deck and then it appears that about 3" of concrete was poured on top of that. There is a stucco ceiling on the bottom.

    A little more than a year ago or so, we discovered we had a termite problem and as a result had to do some structural repairs to include replacing the LVL beam that holds up the lanai/upstairs patio. In the process of jacking the lanai up a little bit to replace the beam, they cracked the concrete upstairs in a few places. The contractor assured me that 'oh we'll squeegee in some epoxy and you'll be good go' -- they also replaced some areas of concrete where we took the old railing down (which are just raw concrete at this point, not painted or anything.)

    Long story short, the cracks are a problem. When it rains, I see water dripping through the stucco ceiling below. I'm unsure whether to engage a roofer or a concrete patio guy at this point. I'm leaning toward roofer due to the water-tight requirements, but I'd like to get some input from you all.

    Any advice on where to start with this? Is there a pragmatic (read: cost effective) solution that doesn't involve replacing the entire upstairs patio? Something like a skim coat over top or something? I can provide some photos later if necessary.

    Thank you all so much for reading this and hopefully pointing me in the right direction!
     
  2. May 6, 2019 #2

    nealtw

    nealtw

    nealtw

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    How much room do you have between the concrete and siding on the walls and to the door threshold.
     
  3. May 6, 2019 #3

    bud16415

    bud16415

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    Well first off welcome to the forum. :welcome:


    I’m far from an expert on this situation but I think we have a few members that will offer some advice. Many work full time and answer when time permits.


    I see you live in Florida and this method of construction may well be common there.


    Just some thoughts as I can see why you would not want to have the slab ripped out and redone. Can you actually see the crack? Putting the epoxy in it sounds like it was a good idea, but I can also see how with a little movement it could open back up.


    I would be tempted to use a rubber roofing membrane to cover the whole surface like they would do a flat roof and then find an outdoor flooring to cover it with. That I think would even be a DIY approach.


    Lets see what our roofing expert says @oldognewtrick
     
  4. May 6, 2019 #4

    nealtw

    nealtw

    nealtw

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    We do that up here, they put a waterproof membrane between the wood and concrete. It can be covered with a TufDeck type sheet vinyl but it has to be made smooth and this stuff runs up the wall behind the siding.
     
  5. May 6, 2019 #5

    bud16415

    bud16415

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    Yep you might have to remove some siding and even do some flashings at the door and such. But I think that’s all DIY friendly for a DIY type homeowner. Maybe even have a pro come in and lay the TufDeck.
     
  6. May 6, 2019 #6

    TJF

    TJF

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    Wow, folks, thank you so much for your quick responses and willingness to steer me in the right direction.

    Let me answer a few questions:

    1) The house has a stucco exterior, so there's no siding or anything. Downstairs it's stucco on concrete block, and upstairs is stucco on wood frame.

    2) I agree the epoxy was probably a good idea, but by that point in the project, the contractor who was doing the work was clearly over his head and just wanted to finish it, so I think he may have done it hastily. He didn't inject it, but just squeegee'ed it into the crack (because it 'sets up quick and the cracks are long'). I also think he should've painted the few square feet of new concrete he put up there, but what's done is done.

    3) The cracks were caused by uneven screw-jacks when doing the previous repair, so I don't think there should be any movement anymore, FWIW.

    I will snap some photos this evening and try and add them to this thread for additional context.

    Thx again! :)
     
  7. May 6, 2019 #7

    oldognewtrick

    oldognewtrick

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    If it were mine, I'd look into elastomeric coating the concrete. Any membrane that would be laid over the concrete would need an isolator secured to the structure. Few homeowners are equipped with the knowledge or tools to install a membrane style roof system. Elastomeric is easier, diy friendly and it can be tinted.
     
  8. May 6, 2019 #8

    TJF

    TJF

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    Ok, 'elastomeric' .. I've heard this before! In lamenting to some friends about this, one of them suggested 'elastomeric paint' but that was as much as he was able to tell me. :) -- Can you suggest a particular product or manufacturer? This patio was painted with outdoor floor paint (Behr stuff from HD, apparently) -- can I put the elastomeric sealant right atop that?
     
  9. May 6, 2019 #9

    oldognewtrick

    oldognewtrick

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    Go to a Sherman-Williams orPorter Paint PPG store and talk to the commercial guy about their coatings and tell him what you have and what you're going over. They will be able to answer your questions. Stay away from the apron stores, all paints are not created equal.
     
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  10. May 6, 2019 #10

    TJF

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    Thanks for the pointer -- I will give SW a shot! If anyone else has anything else to add, please feel free.
     
  11. May 6, 2019 #11

    nealtw

    nealtw

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    Tuffdeck and others have a roof rated product but they are not DIY friendly
     
  12. May 6, 2019 #12

    Snoonyb

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    Here is the product I've used extensively; https://lifedeck.biz/waterproofing/waterproofing-fm-system/

    The FM system is a DIY with a, pay attention, learning curve.

    The crack should have been filled and tooled with SIKAFLEX adhesive caulk, available from Home Depot.

    If you just type in Lifedeck their entire system will come up so that you can see the variations of applications. The downside is that may not be available in FLA, however, you'll have some greater understanding .
     
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  13. May 6, 2019 #13

    TJF

    TJF

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    I'm not against hiring a professional to do this work if it's outside of my DIY comfort range. The Lifedeck stuff looks like just the animal I need, honestly. It's definitely helping my research. Thank you all!
     
  14. May 7, 2019 #14

    Snoonyb

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    Lifedeck is sold only on the west coast and Arizona.

    They sell deck coating and cooldeck, deck paints, which are not unpleasant to the bare foot, in direct sunlight.

    However, the broader point is that you should be asking a decking contractor, who will probably have similar products available.

    Here is a search engine; http://www.thebluebook.com
     
  15. May 7, 2019 #15

    TJF

    TJF

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    Thank you, this is helpful.
     
  16. May 7, 2019 #16

    mabloodhound

    mabloodhound

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    I have a similar deck (2nd floor over porch) and it is just plywood that I used a white deck waterproof paint on. Two coats and it has lasted 4 years in New England weather. I plan to re-coat it this year. Bought 5 gallon bucket at Lowes I believe.
     

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