Concrete Flume Removal

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Reelsix

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Hi - I have a very old concrete flume that runs along the edge of my 1930s home. It is unsightly and water puddles in it at times and I am hoping to remove it. Photos attached. I have had quotes to add a couple of catch basins and to connect downspouts to a buried pipe that will run to the curb. The fall to the street is very slight but I have been assured that they can create the fall to make it work. They will replace removed flume (and pavers seen in photos) with dirt and mulch.

Any risk I should consider?

Thanks

IMG_2988.jpeg
 

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Sparky617

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Does the water from the driveway flow away from the house? If it flows into your bedding there you might want to install a curb on the edge of the driveway to divert the water away from your house.
 

Reelsix

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Does the water from the driveway flow away from the house? If it flows into your bedding there you might want to install a curb on the edge of the driveway to divert the water away from your house.
Thankfully it does from what I have observed.
 

Sparky617

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I doubt the concrete is tied into your house, so I think the risks are slight. You might want to start by cutting a groove in a section from the bed to the house and then breaking it out. Use a concrete blade in a circular saw to make the cut. If it is poured up against the house and separate from the house you can break it up without fear. A easier way to break it up is to use a pick or a digging iron to raise up the slab so it isn't against the ground. Then a well place hit with a sledge hammer should break it up. So I'd start at one end and work my way down the line, lifting it up a bit, breaking it up and moving on. Having a little space below the concrete makes your sledge hammer blows more effective.
 

Reelsix

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I doubt the concrete is tied into your house, so I think the risks are slight. You might want to start by cutting a groove in a section from the bed to the house and then breaking it out. Use a concrete blade in a circular saw to make the cut. If it is poured up against the house and separate from the house you can break it up without fear. A easier way to break it up is to use a pick or a digging iron to raise up the slab so it isn't against the ground. Then a well place hit with a sledge hammer should break it up. So I'd start at one end and work my way down the line, lifting it up a bit, breaking it up and moving on. Having a little space below the concrete makes your sledge hammer blows more effective.
Great. Thanks for the insight.
 

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