Concrete vs Steel

Discussion in 'Framing and Foundation' started by TxBuilder, Feb 10, 2010.

  1. Feb 10, 2010 #1
    I need to get my foundation leveled and secured.

    Debating between steel piers and concrete.

    Steel says they can reach further to the bedrock then concrete and rusting is not an issue.

    Curious opinions on why concrete might be the better option.
     
  2. Feb 10, 2010 #2

    Wuzzat?

    Wuzzat?

    Wuzzat?

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  3. Feb 28, 2010 #3

    itsreallyconc

    itsreallyconc

    itsreallyconc

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    acme screw anchors & be done w/it !

    no financial interest
     
  4. Feb 28, 2010 #4
    Can you expand more on what acme screw anchors are and why they are superior.
     
  5. Feb 28, 2010 #5

    itsreallyconc

    itsreallyconc

    itsreallyconc

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    helical piles - we've done both & i like 'em better,,, back to my nap ;)
     
  6. Feb 28, 2010 #6

    inspectorD

    inspectorD

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    helical piles...you can adjust them later on if something where to happen.

    basically, really big screws...for your soil...to hold up your house.:trophy:
     
  7. Feb 28, 2010 #7

    Wuzzat?

    Wuzzat?

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    Google Image Result for http://www.carolinafoundation.com/customers/104012215025135/images/helical_piles-pile_contractors.jpg

    ". . .most houses weigh in at between 80,000 and 160,000 pounds. Of course, this is sans foundation and concrete floor slabs. . ."

    Do you have expansive soil?

    "A deep foundation is used to transfer a load from a structure through an upper weak layer of soil to a stronger deeper layer of soil. There are different types of deep foundations including helical piles, impact driven piles, drilled shafts, caissons, piers, and earth stabilized columns. The naming conventions for different types of foundations vary between different engineers. Historically, piles were wood, later steel, reinforced concrete, and pre-tensioned concrete"

    http://www.profoundationtech.com/foundation-piers/ecp-compare.html
     
    Last edited: Feb 28, 2010
  8. Feb 28, 2010 #8

    Bud Cline

    Bud Cline

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    ...and bell-bottoms as well as spread footings.:D
     
  9. Feb 28, 2010 #9

    Wuzzat?

    Wuzzat?

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    Foundation Stabilization and Repair: Helical piers and push piers, pier prices pier supplier pier spacing fortress stabilization expert basement repair cleveland

    Cost of Foundation Repair - Get Prices and Estimates - CostHelper.com

    And "push piers" are not the same.
    Push pier assembly with hardened coupling sections - Patent application

    Drill depth for generic piers, 5 to 30' w/avg. = 17'.
    Standard penetration test - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Since a concrete column is not too good at resisting bending forces, and
    ". . .pier devices oftentimes experience significant lateral forces. . ."
    steel seems better if you have to go deep.
    I don't know what the cost breakeven point for depth for concrete vs. steel is. . .10'?
     
    Last edited: Feb 28, 2010
  10. Mar 11, 2010 #10

    SavvyCat

    SavvyCat

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    When I had the foundation guy out I asked him about the difference. It depends chiefly on your soil, so he said. My clay soil holds more moisture around the steel pier and it will rust, also the bedrock in my area (and I forgot what he said it was) can be fractured driving the steel piers to refusal--it won't refuse, it will just give, and then you have even bigger problems.

    So it's not a cost decision, it's really what is used most successfully in your area. Most likely mine is useless information to you.
     
    Last edited: Mar 11, 2010

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