Converting Garage....Foundation Question

Discussion in 'Framing and Foundation' started by cibula11, Aug 6, 2009.

  1. Aug 6, 2009 #1

    cibula11

    cibula11

    cibula11

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    We're considering converting our single car attached to a bedroom/bath. I have a few questions about the foundation.

    1.) How do we determine if the current garage has a foundation and is not just a slab?

    2.) Do we necessarily need the garage to have a foundation or can the current space be converted as is assuming there is just a slab (we'll have to raise the floors using 2x's anyway)

    3.) If the garage needs a foundation, could you build the floor as you would a deck and attach a ledger and drill holes for posts, etc.?
     
  2. Aug 14, 2009 #2

    cibula11

    cibula11

    cibula11

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    Okay, I have been advised just to dig and find out whether there is a footer or not. Our local building dept. (which I will be contacting shortly) uses IBC 2003 for code. That being said, does anyone know whether that code would allow us to convert the garage if there was NO footer below frost line? I know local codes can differ. I'm assuming this would be okay considering the garage may have been built without a footer below frost.
     
  3. Aug 14, 2009 #3

    inspectorD

    inspectorD

    inspectorD

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    New code is probably going to tell you, need deeper footers. It was ok then, but any improvements, no matter how much they cost, have to follow code. Sorry to be the one.:eek:
     
  4. Aug 15, 2009 #4

    cibula11

    cibula11

    cibula11

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    I appreciate the info. My building inspector is going to be getting back to me on Monday on what things I need to make sure. If footing depth is not on his list then I guess I'll assume its not an issue. If he mentions it, I guess I'll be doing it the right way.
     
  5. Aug 29, 2009 #5

    cibula11

    cibula11

    cibula11

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    So....I've had the space inspected and I'm onto the next steps. If we hire out electric and plumbing for the area...any ideas on what that could run me? Or at the very least what would be the price difference between adding a full bath as opposed to a half bath?
     
  6. Aug 29, 2009 #6

    inspectorD

    inspectorD

    inspectorD

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    basics? Costs vary...full bath minimum 5k, half 3k. Usually the fixtures, plumbing and extra detailed finishes cost the most.
    Buy good stuff= get good stuff. You are what makes it expensive in the long run.

    Good luck.
     
  7. Aug 29, 2009 #7

    cibula11

    cibula11

    cibula11

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    I plan on doing as much as possible. I won't hire any finish work out, but rather would have a plumber and electrician in to do the majority of that type of work. I would just need it "roughed in" and I can take care of the rest. Would that significantly lower the 3-5 K range?
     
  8. Aug 30, 2009 #8

    inspectorD

    inspectorD

    inspectorD

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    It depends on what you purchase for fixtures, the tie ins for the plumbing and the unforseen issues that always come up. but that is usually the # for the parts...diy.Then add on from there with what degree of product you will buy.
    To spend less, Look around for stuff folks have purchased but are not going to use, just remember there is no return policy.:eek:
    And sometimes DIY can cost more...like when you screw up really big and crack the tub drain flange.
    Good thing they can repair them nowadays as one of my customers had to find out the hard way.
    As always, just do your homework and write your list of things to purchase , and what you can do yourself. That will help you with the real # you are looking for.:)
     

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