Correct way (per code) to add additional items to an outlet that is on it's own circuit?

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vyacheslav

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Greetings,

I am doing some work in my kitchen and I currently have two outlets that are both on their own circuit (and nothing else is on that circuit). So, the wiring runs directly from the breaker box to the outlet without interruption.

I want to move the outlets slightly and I want to run an overhead fixture off of each outlet (circuit) to save on the load of my existing overhead. My question is: How do I run additional wiring off these stand alone outlets correctly? I can't just run the new wiring off the existing outlets as is, because I am moving each outlet up several feet, so I'll need additional wire for slack on the outlet, which would cause me to find a solution for a few extra feet of slack wire anyway (not enough coming directly from the breaker box as is).

I would assume that I would install a junction box where the additional wiring could be added and contained. My basement has an "open" ceiling with joists exposed, so it's very easy to access all the wiring and route it correctly. For example, after disconnecting the circuit of course, I would disconnect the wire from the outlet, pull it back down through the kitchen wall/floor/basement ceiling, and then install a junction box on my basement ceiling joist (I have several already in various parts of the basement) near where it enters the basement ceiling/kitchen floor/wall. I could then run several wires back up through the kitchen floor/wall coming from the junction box, using the original wire (that is connected to the breaker box) as a power source. Is this the correct way to do this per code?

Thanks for your help!

V
 
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Snoonyb

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The short answer is, NO, what you propose is incorrect.

Given the age of the dwelling, are the two existing kitchen outlets presently protected by either a GFCI/AFCI breaker or by GFCI receptacles?
 

vyacheslav

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Yes, there are two GFCI outlets near the sink, however they are on the opposite wall from where I am speaking about. The house was built in 1947 but all the electric, all wires, outlets, switches etc., including the circuit breaker box, were upgraded in 2005. So, everything is using current, modern wire that's available today.
 

Snoonyb

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Thanks.
Were the walls opened and the boxes replaced/changed/exchanged, when the rewiring was accomplished?
 

vyacheslav

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The boxes were all replaced, yes. The walls remained in tact, but I know that the boxes and wiring/switches were all replaced with new.
 

Snoonyb

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Thanks.
1st, it's against code to mix lights and receptacles, it's also impractical to believe that anyone would see the advantage of being placed in the dark, because of a tripped breaker, caused by an overloaded recep.

2nd, in laymen terms, romex is supposed to be secured within 9" of the box it's terminated in.
 

JoeD

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Kitchen receptacles are not allowed to contain lighting loads. Anywhere else in the house it is OK.
 

bud16415

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Kitchen receptacles are not allowed to contain lighting loads. Anywhere else in the house it is OK.

I know code doesn’t permit it but when wiring my kitchen she wanted a light right above the sink and she wanted the switch for it in what I call the wet zone around the sink. A place where you could be touching the wet SS sink and the switch at the same time. I wired the lights power off the GFCI right next to it allowing the GFCI to protect the switch and light.



I never saw a problem with doing this and I often wonder why code wouldn’t allow it.

Am I missing something?
 

Rusty

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I know code doesn’t permit it but when wiring my kitchen she wanted a light right above the sink and she wanted the switch for it in what I call the wet zone around the sink. A place where you could be touching the wet SS sink and the switch at the same time. I wired the lights power off the GFCI right next to it allowing the GFCI to protect the switch and light.



I never saw a problem with doing this and I often wonder why code wouldn’t allow it.

Am I missing something?
Sometimes codes are stupid and not practical.
 

WyrTwister

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Thanks.
1st, it's against code to mix lights and receptacles, it's also impractical to believe that anyone would see the advantage of being placed in the dark, because of a tripped breaker, caused by an overloaded recep.

2nd, in laymen terms, romex is supposed to be secured within 9" of the box it's terminated in.
Referring to residential dwellings , code provides for lighting and receptacle circuits . It is perfectly legal to connect a mix of light fixtures and receptacles to such a circuit . I personally prefer to keep them separate . But , that is just me and most of my experience has been commercial work .

God bless
Wyr
 

afjes_2016

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Referring to residential dwellings , code provides for lighting and receptacle circuits . It is perfectly legal to connect a mix of light fixtures and receptacles to such a circuit . I personally prefer to keep them separate . But , that is just me and most of my experience has been commercial work .
The OP is referring to the kitchen in this case and you can not mix lighting and SABC receptacles on the same circuit in a kitchen.
 

WyrTwister

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True , but I do not remember any prohibition to also installing the kitchen lighting on general lighting and receptacle circuits . Or or installing general purpose convenience outlets on lighting and receptacle circuits . I could be incorrect on that ?

In commercial work , it is quite common to wire the receptacles on different circuits , than the lighting .

Wyr
God bless
 
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