crown installation

Discussion in 'Carpentry and Woodworking' started by de103065, Jan 11, 2019.

Help Support House Repair Talk by donating:

  1. Jan 11, 2019 #1

    de103065

    de103065

    de103065

    Member

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2018
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    1
    I'm installing crown molding for the first time. I have a square room that is a 12 x 12. I know that I need make all inside cuts on the crown molding. I have seven 8ft crown molding lengths. How do I measure the crown? Do I measure from the top angle of the crown that sits against the ceiling. I want to make sure I measure correctly so I get a good tight fit in each corner with the inside cuts. Thanks for any help. Regards.
     
  2. Jan 11, 2019 #2

    Sparky617

    Sparky617

    Sparky617

    Member

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2014
    Messages:
    1,039
    Likes Received:
    369
    Here is a good video from This Old House on the subject.

     
  3. Jan 11, 2019 #3

    Sparky617

    Sparky617

    Sparky617

    Member

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2014
    Messages:
    1,039
    Likes Received:
    369
    Here is another.
     
  4. Jan 11, 2019 #4

    Sparky617

    Sparky617

    Sparky617

    Member

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2014
    Messages:
    1,039
    Likes Received:
    369
  5. Jan 12, 2019 #5

    joecaption

    joecaption

    joecaption

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2011
    Messages:
    2,286
    Likes Received:
    375
    soparklion11 likes this.
  6. Jan 12, 2019 #6

    havasu

    havasu

    havasu

    Administrator Staff Member Admin Moderator

    Joined:
    May 21, 2010
    Messages:
    3,951
    Likes Received:
    89
    I agree. Too many pieces distracts from the beauty of crown molding.
     
  7. Jan 12, 2019 #7

    soparklion11

    soparklion11

    soparklion11

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2012
    Messages:
    84
    Likes Received:
    4
    I've done it a few times... coping is easier than you'd think and its fairly forgiving...
     
  8. Jan 13, 2019 #8

    mabloodhound

    mabloodhound

    mabloodhound

    Restoration & Renovations

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2008
    Messages:
    233
    Likes Received:
    60
    Coping is a must on inside corners. But those 8' lengths are going to be a pain. Do not butt join them in the middle; use an mitered joint at least 30ยบ, then measure the length of the other piece from that. 12' lengths would be best.
     
  9. Jan 13, 2019 #9

    soparklion11

    soparklion11

    soparklion11

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2012
    Messages:
    84
    Likes Received:
    4
    When I've had tiny pieces like the one on the left in the picture for the video, I've found it easier to just glue them in place as the recoil from my nail gun tends to cause some shifting in very small pieces. Anyone else use the same strategy?
     
  10. Jan 13, 2019 #10

    mabloodhound

    mabloodhound

    mabloodhound

    Restoration & Renovations

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2008
    Messages:
    233
    Likes Received:
    60
    I use an adhesive caulk and a pin nailer; no recoil from a pin nailer.
     
  11. Jan 14, 2019 #11

    havasu

    havasu

    havasu

    Administrator Staff Member Admin Moderator

    Joined:
    May 21, 2010
    Messages:
    3,951
    Likes Received:
    89
    Caulking will hide massive mistakes, provided you are not using natural, non-painted wood. If that's the case, ya gotta be pretty spot on.

    I also have scrap pieces for left and right, inside and outside corners. Sure helps making sure you are cutting at the right angle.
     
    nealtw likes this.
  12. Jan 14, 2019 #12

    Sparky617

    Sparky617

    Sparky617

    Member

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2014
    Messages:
    1,039
    Likes Received:
    369
    One key is to make sure your crown is in the saw at the same angle it will be placed on the wall. If it slips down your cuts will never match. Coping the inside corners is much better than trying to do a compound 45. That said, really complicated profiles can be a challenge to cope and to get to fit.
     

Share This Page