cutting concrete block with a table saw

Discussion in 'Tools' started by slownsteady, Aug 8, 2014.

  1. Aug 8, 2014 #1

    slownsteady

    slownsteady

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    I need to cut a couple of concrete cap blocks for a retaining wall. I have used my circular saw in the past and I have to make two cuts bc the 7" blade isn't big enough. So can I put a 10" diamond blade on my table saw and run the block through on that...or am I just asking for a headache?

    Alternate plan would be to rent a larger circ saw for about $40
     
  2. Aug 8, 2014 #2

    nealtw

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    Cut it from both sides with 7.25 blade, Total cut will be almost 4 1/2"
     
  3. Aug 8, 2014 #3

    slownsteady

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    so you don't recommend the table saw?
     
  4. Aug 8, 2014 #4

    nealtw

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    The cost of a 10" blade would be a factor for me. I like to drible water on the cut so it would depend on the table saw.
     
  5. Aug 8, 2014 #5

    Chris

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    You can get a 10" blade for dry cutting and it will work but I would wear clothing that covers everything and good safety glasses because it will throw little pieces of sand and they hurt.

    If you have a block yard nearby see if they have a wet saw, many do.

    Also I have a 14" gas powered cutoff saw and you can rent them by the day at depot or any other rental yard. They have diamond blades for those too. We use them daily.
     
  6. Aug 8, 2014 #6

    nealtw

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    We can rent the saw too, but we have to have our own blade.
     
  7. Aug 8, 2014 #7

    slownsteady

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    Yeah, the saw is about $40 for the rental and I can get a diamond blade rental for an additional $40 (!?) or I can buy a 10" diamond blade for the same $40. Considering I have to make only about 2 or 3 cuts, the cost of a rental seems silly. I have used the 7.5" saw to do this before and that's okay but i was wondering if the table saw would be better or worse. It def would be more expensive if I trashed my table saw.
     
  8. Aug 8, 2014 #8

    nealtw

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    The cut wouldn't hurt the saw it would get sand blasted or maybe some sparks or if you run water, what about the motor.
     
  9. Aug 8, 2014 #9

    slownsteady

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    I would cut it dry on the table. i usually just cut dry with the circ saw too.
    The more I think about it, the more i want to stay with the circ saw. I already have that blade, so it's no additional cost at all. And Chris makes a good point - the blade rotation on the table saw would throw more stuff my way.
     
  10. Aug 8, 2014 #10

    beachguy005

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    I cut a bunch of of concrete blocks just using an angle grinder with a diamond blade. Even though I couldn't cut all the way through I cut it around and just snapped it off at the cut.
    Frankly, the snapped part looked more natural than the cut parts but any ragged edges can be dressed with the tool.
     
  11. Aug 8, 2014 #11

    slownsteady

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    The cuts here would be the seams between the caps. Smooth and straight for a flush fit. Two passes will cut all the way through-I just have to be spot-on with the second pass. That's why I thought the larger blade on the table saw would be good.
     
  12. Aug 19, 2014 #12

    stadry

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    i don't think a table saw has enough rpm's to run a diamond blade for masonary work BUT i've been wrong before,,, demo saws run about 5 - 6,000rpm's as i recall & blades are specifically made for them
     
  13. Aug 20, 2014 #13

    nealtw

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    table saw turns a 3400rpm
     
  14. Aug 20, 2014 #14

    Chris

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    What about a skil saw with a diamond blade? I have one and use it frequently. It cuts deeper than a angle grinder.
     
  15. Aug 20, 2014 #15

    slownsteady

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    Diamond blade on a 71/2" craftsman circular saw cuts well without much effort. Sure, a demo saw would be nice, but if I ran out and bought every tool for every purpose....., and renting one for just a couple of cuts isn't economical.
     
  16. Aug 20, 2014 #16

    inspectorD

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    Yup, and just make sure you plug it into a GFCI outlet.... because you need to pour water on the brick as you cut it...or you will have dust like you won't believe.. It also cools the blade.
    Have a hose just running water over the cut at a trickle works best.
     
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  17. Aug 21, 2014 #17

    nealtw

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    We use these saws in the rain while standing in the mud all the time. If you do get a shock it is only when the motor is running so you are sharing the load and not getting full value.
    Most gfci only kick off when your extention cord falls in the water. And some don't kick off when you get a shock even if they pass the test:eek:
     
  18. Aug 22, 2014 #18

    mako1

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    I would think it would be dangerous and scar the hell out of the table.Plus sending all kinds of dust into the motor.You know it will bind.A block is not going to run thru a tablesaw smoothly.
    Use an angle grinder with a diamond blade and be done.Score them as deep as you can all around.Break it off and clean it up.Still a couple minute job an not taking a chance of screwing up a table saw.
     
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  19. Aug 23, 2014 #19

    stadry

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    we use skilsaws w/diamond blades however our saws are mounted on rollercarts for conc scoring & cutting
     

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