Cutting holes in laminate countertop

Discussion in 'General Home Improvement Discussion' started by jimroche, Jan 22, 2009.

  1. Jan 22, 2009 #1

    jimroche

    jimroche

    jimroche

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    Hello,

    We are trying to cut a hole in the kitchen countertop for our sink. What is the best saw to use? What is the first thing that needs to be done. Please help!
     
  2. Jan 23, 2009 #2

    Rustedbird

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    Center the sink, hopefully you got a paper pattern with it. Makes it much easier. Small pilot hole then a jigsaw. Of course the counter has to be not installed yet. My own druthers, is to order the counter already to size and with the sink hole already done.

    Also google installing kitchen sink. Plenty of info out there, some with pictures.
     
  3. Jan 23, 2009 #3

    CraigFL

    CraigFL

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    First you have to decide if you want an undermounted sink or a top mounted one. Top mounted will allow you to use that jigsaw and cover the rough cut hole.
     
  4. Jan 30, 2009 #4

    warden

    warden

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    ditto. use blue painter's tape around the desired opening to cut down on the rough edges.
     
  5. Feb 13, 2009 #5

    ramcharger

    ramcharger

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    Like warden said, once you have located the position of the opening, drill holes in the corners. You can use regular masking to cut down the chatter of the saw blade. Also use a fine tooth blade in your jig saw and take your time with the cuts. Slower is better.
     
  6. Feb 18, 2009 #6

    nickroqs

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    Use tape where you are going to saw to prevent chipping of the laminate.
     
  7. Mar 20, 2009 #7

    Johnboy555

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    That's right, but also get some 2" masking or duct tape and go out about 3 or 4" outside of the hole so the base of the saw doesn't scratch the top!! Better safe for a few cents than sorry!

    House Doc
     
  8. Mar 20, 2009 #8

    GBR

    GBR

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    All of the above, and use a reverse tooth jig saw blade (cuts on the down-stroke, no chipping). Be safe, GBR
     
  9. Mar 20, 2009 #9

    inspectorD

    inspectorD

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    Annnddd...if you use the downstroke blade, make sure your jigsaw is not orbital, you will be hanging on to a jumpin bean.:)
     
  10. Mar 20, 2009 #10

    GBR

    GBR

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    Good catch, inspectorD. I forgot that, as my orbital disappeared (jumped or walked off), and have been using my oldie piece of Black and Decker. Some new ones have settings of degree of forward movement, and even a light, which is really cool! The most fun is having to use your skill saw and hole saw---very carefully---when cutting out.

    I installed 8 mill plastic sheetrock dust guard about 12" x 12", between jig and shoe base, to cut ceilings. Use a regular blade, shortened (2 pliers snap) to 5/8 long on the down-stroke. It barely scores the ceiling joists and never cut pipes or wires when demoing. Be safe, GBR
     

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