DIYer new to your site

Discussion in 'Introductions' started by kdschreck, Dec 31, 2007.

  1. Dec 31, 2007 #1

    kdschreck

    kdschreck

    kdschreck

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    I was doing a search to learn about acquiring a tester for gas line pressure. Thankfully, I found this site along the way! I have a wall-mount propane heater to install in my basement playroom, so I am hopeful to find helpful suggestions on the site for safe and efficient installation.

    KDSchreck
     
  2. Dec 31, 2007 #2

    glennjanie

    glennjanie

    glennjanie

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    Welcome KDSChreck:
    Propane is best left to the man who sold it to you. Many states have strict laws on handling propane. It leaks out and is heavier than air, so it goes to a quiet corner and lays there. It won't dissipate without fan forced ventilation. Then the slightest spark, even static electricity, will cause it to explode violently. Travel trailers have been completely flattened by this. Houses have had whole walls blown out. I knew a man who had been blown across the room 3 times trying to light water heaters; lucky guy died of natrual causes a couple of years ago.
    Please, PLEASE, get help on this one; your life is worth more than the $200 you would save.
    Glenn
     
  3. Jan 1, 2008 #3

    ToolGuy

    ToolGuy

    ToolGuy

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    Yep, Propane can go boom in a big way. I've been in the trades over 25 years and have rolled up my sleeves for just about every type of task, but there are some things I won't touch. Except for outdoor barbeques, propane is at the top of that list. :eek:
     
  4. Jan 6, 2008 #4

    kdschreck

    kdschreck

    kdschreck

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    Woud you say the same for natural gas?

    KDSchreck
     
  5. Jan 6, 2008 #5

    ToolGuy

    ToolGuy

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    Not necessarily. Natural gas has an added odor which is unmistakable, so you'll know if it's leaking. Propane, while it does have a distinctive odor, most people don't recognize it. Also, the odor of propane doesn't tend to propogate into the air like that of natural gas. So if the leaked propane settles to the floor (as it does), you might not smell it when standing up.

    Both are highly explosive when mixed with oxygen. But with natural gas, you're far more likely to know when it's leaking.
     
  6. Jan 20, 2008 #6

    kdschreck

    kdschreck

    kdschreck

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    Thanks ToolGuy.

    I have successfully connected a natural gas space heater to the existing 1/2" gas line, checked all connections for leaks with soapy water solution, plus the "sniff test", and waited for 60 - 90 minutes before lighting anything back up. Everything is working fine.

    In retrospect, I'm wondering if I should've tapped into the 3/4" or 1" line rather than the 1/2". I suspect I'm not getting quite enough gas to the space heater. It's about 10 linear feet of gas line away from the "T" where I connected it to the existing line, but I am still left wondering if going from 3/4" for most of that run would have been better.

    KDSchreck
     
  7. Jan 20, 2008 #7

    glennjanie

    glennjanie

    glennjanie

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    Hello KDSchreck:
    If your heater will burn a clean blue flame, it is getting enough gas and I wouldn't worry about it.
    Glenn
     

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