Drop Ceiling or Drywall ceiling in basement

Discussion in 'Walls and Ceilings' started by ToeJoe, Jan 25, 2015.

  1. Jan 25, 2015 #1

    ToeJoe

    ToeJoe

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    Which is better to have in basement a drop ceiling or a drywall ceiling?

    I was going with a drop ceiling and thought it over and it would cost me less to put a drywall ceiling up.

    Any comments are helpful.
     
  2. Jan 25, 2015 #2

    mako1

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    Depends on what's in the ceiling.For one,you have to have access to any junction boxes .How about heat ducts.A drop ceiling can go below these where you will have to build bulkheads if installing drywall.
     
  3. Jan 25, 2015 #3

    kok328

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    IMO drop ceilings are better in that they allow you to access electrical, ductwork, plumbing and cabling at a later date without having to repair the drywall after you open it up to address and issue/additions with the above mentioned utilities.
     
  4. Jan 26, 2015 #4

    nealtw

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    I am a firm beleiver in fire rated ceilings so it would be drywall for me but as mentioned you do not want to hide juntion boxes, plumbing clean outs or valves. And as mentioned about the bulkheads unless you want the whole ceiling to be below the level of heat ducts, I would still built the boxes.
     
  5. Jan 26, 2015 #5

    Sparky617

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    I prefer smooth finished drywall. I can patch it if I ever need to access plumbing. Heat ducts shouldn't need access with the exception of replacing the furnace. The furnace area should allow enough access to connect the new furnace without cutting drywall. I have plumbing and electrical in my first floor ceiling and it's drywall.

    ALL junction boxes need to come through the ceiling, none can be buried in the ceiling. If you have a shut off valve you can install an access panel to allow you to have access to the valve. You could do the same with a plumbing clean out.
     
  6. Jan 26, 2015 #6

    ToeJoe

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    I have rewired the whole house about 2 years ago and the duck work would be OK, junction boxes are OK also not behind any drywall. The only thing would be the canister lights which has to come through ceiling.
     
  7. Jan 26, 2015 #7

    nealtw

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    Two types, the box is already installed, you need something like a roto zip for cutting drywall around boxes. Or the type that you just leave the wire loose and cut a hole later and install the can.
    You also want to check the framing beside wall that run in the same direction as the joists, someties you have to add backing.
    Do you know how to build drops around duct work?
     
  8. Jan 26, 2015 #8

    beachguy005

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    I think the only thing drop ceilings are good for is future access above them and if you want a fancy tile. They are more expensive and require a fair amount of labor to install correctly. Easy to mess with and damage once installed.
    Drywall is an easier and quicker DIY job. Cost is a lot lower. Patching is cheaper than buying a new tile. You can install either new or old work down lights.
     
  9. Jan 26, 2015 #9

    Sparky617

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    If you use an old work can you can actually remove it since it is clipped to the drywall ceiling after it is installed. You run a loop of wire to each location you want to put a can and then cut the can in after the ceiling is installed. Alternatively make sure you test your cans before you close the ceiling because accessing them after the fact can be a real PITA.

    That said, look at this LED can light replacement. They'll mount to a regular round ceiling box, no can required. They can be installed in a can, but they don't require one and a ceiling box is a lot cheaper than a can.

    http://www.homedepot.com/p/Halo-5-i...isk-Light-80-CRI-3000K-SLD606830WHR/204732243
     
  10. Jan 27, 2015 #10

    GBR

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    Any gas fittings in the ceiling you need to leave access for?

    Gary
     
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  11. Jan 27, 2015 #11

    ToeJoe

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    Everything is in the section that is not getting a ceiling.
     
  12. Jan 27, 2015 #12

    nealtw

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    Are you worried about sound proofing?
     
  13. Jan 27, 2015 #13

    ToeJoe

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    Should I be? Anything that you know can improve someones remodeling.
     
  14. Jan 27, 2015 #14

    nealtw

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    I filled the cavities with safe and sound insuation, which turn out just slitly better than nothing. I have done fibreglass in the past and thought that was good. Now you can buy a metal channel to screw up and then screw the board to that but I haven't used it.
     
  15. Jan 27, 2015 #15

    Sparky617

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    The metal channels will isolate a lot of the vibrations that transmit through the floor joists for the room above.
     
  16. Jan 29, 2015 #16

    slownsteady

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    Also consider the ceiling height in a basement. If you have a low basement, it will only get lower with a drop ceiling.
     
  17. Jan 29, 2015 #17

    Sparky617

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    There is a product called CeilingMax that allows you to install a suspended ceiling with virtually no loss in headroom. I still prefer drywall.
     

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