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drywall to stud spacer?

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analogmusicman

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I just finished (well almost) building a wall downstairs in my house. before I start attaching drywall to the studs,since in places the studs aren't exactly even, (there'll be a space between the drywall and some studs) I need to put some sort of "spacer" in there so the wall isn't "wavy". I know there's some product (I'm speculating it comes in a roll) which is a thin cardboard (1.5 inches wide). I know it exists since I found some on some studs I removed once. so,anyone know what it's called?

tnx,
 

slownsteady

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I would rather rip a strip of luan or some other thin plywood for this purpose. Is it an even spacing throughout (from stud to stud and the length of the stud)? You may find you need to customize each one.
 

analogmusicman

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I would rather rip a strip of luan or some other thin plywood for this purpose. Is it an even spacing throughout (from stud to stud and the length of the stud)? You may find you need to customize each one.
I would think that "luan" would be too thick. there's probably a need for only 1/8-1/16 to fill since I DID watch carefully the "levelness" and "squareness" of everything as I built this wall but in my experience,no matter how careful you are, there's not going to be perfectly aligned studs.

tnx,
 

oldognewtrick

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:agree: once it's taped and painted, you'll never see the difference. All walls have some imperfections in them. Take a flashlight and shine it down any wall and you'll see waves.
 

Snoonyb

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I just finished (well almost) building a wall downstairs in my house. before I start attaching drywall to the studs,since in places the studs aren't exactly even, (there'll be a space between the drywall and some studs) I need to put some sort of "spacer" in there so the wall isn't "wavy". I know there's some product (I'm speculating it comes in a roll) which is a thin cardboard (1.5 inches wide). I know it exists since I found some on some studs I removed once. so,anyone know what it's called?

tnx,
Both low brow and home desperado sell packages of cardboard drywall spacers.
 

CallMeVilla

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Drywall guys commonly use shim strips. They come in long strips of very thin paper and can be doubled or tripled to get the exact bump out for your wall. At 45", they are the perfect length by being the width of a sheet of drywall or half of an eight-foot length. At 1 1/2" wide, they are the width of a stud. At about 1/8" thick, they are thin enough to correct shallow irregularities, but can be stacked to address worse problems. Use a stapler to attach them to the studs.

Try this as an example .... but they are readily available at Home Depot and other places ...

http://homerenovations.about.com/od/drywallsheetrock/ss/Drywall-Shims.htm
 

analogmusicman

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and by the way, I've got some scraps of "PT" lumber which I'd like to use instead of cutting up some regular studs. (for blocking inside walls etc.) is that a good idea? or will the chemicals infused in the PT lumber "leach out" over time and stain the walls?

tnx,
 

kok328

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/1/8-1/16th isn't going to matter much.
FYI - use metal studs for your next wall, they are far more even than wood.
 

mako1

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I'm with the other that it won't be noticeable after the wall is floated out.If it makes you feel better use some strips of 30# felt paper.It can be doubled or whatever to get what you need where you need it and easily trimmed with a utility knife.
 
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