Electric Kettle (Pitcher)

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Eddie_T

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Looking for a fast electric kettle. On an outreach medical mission to Russia we noticed that the electric pitcher in the break room heated several cups of water much faster than a microwave. One nurse wanted to purchase one to take home. I explained that it was 230v and unless she wired a 240v outlet it wouldn't work. Our 240v outlets and plugs are so clunky compared to European outlets that I considered installing a European outlet under my cooktop. However it might present a code problem to the next occupant.

Do any of the advertised 120v fast kettles really heat fast? The European pitcher heated so fast that by the time you unwrapped a tea bag and placed it in the cup the water was ready to pour.
 

bud16415

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Is Russia and other countries with 240v like ours two 120s with a ground or do they have 240 to ground?

I had an electric percolator at work I received as a gift almost 50 years ago and never once did I perc coffee in it. we just used it to make hot water. The tube and basket were long gone. It worked great and heated water pretty fast. I would think they still make them.
 

Eddie_T

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In Russia it's 230v only and one leg is grounded. I don't know if they have a ground wire as well. I thought about modifying a WSS204 1600 watts Step Down Travel Converter (that someone had suggested for adding a 120v circuit in a well shed) but I can't believe that little thing will handle 1600 watts.
1600 watts WSS204 Step Down Converter - World Import
1643312404780.png

Look how neat a European 230v plug is. I wouldn't mind having an outlet to accept that but it couldn't be grounded. I wouldn't care but what happens after my expiry?
0127221425.jpg
 

bud16415

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In Russia it's 230v only and one leg is grounded. I don't know if they have a ground wire as well. I thought about modifying a WSS204 1600 watts Step Down Travel Converter (that someone had suggested for adding a 120v circuit in a well) but I can't believe that little thing will handle 1600 watts.
1600 watts WSS204 Step Down Converter - World Import
View attachment 27430

Look how neat a European 230v plug is. I wouldn't mind having an outlet to accept that but it couldn't be grounded. I wouldn't care but what happens after my expiry?
View attachment 27429
Looks like a death trap to me. Looks like it can be plugged in ether direction also so no control over what side is hot and with double the voltage human resistance unchanged it might not be a good thing. Do they have GFCI also?

I do wish cars would have skipped 12v going from 6v straight to at least 24v.
 

Eddie_T

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I don't know if they have GFCI outlets or not, it would be feasible. The plug itself is no more a death trap than our 240v plugs. In fact less hazardous as insertion is much easier.The appliance in this case doesn't care which way the plug is inserted. I don't recall whether the receptacles have a third hole or not.
I don't use all the elements on my cooktop so I could remove the least used element, replace it with a European receptacle in a cover and just turn the simmerstat to max when using the hotpot. however maybe the 120v hotpots are as fast as they say, if not I could return it.

I am intrigued with the little converter. If it could perchance handle a short term load of 1600 watts as advertised I could modify it to run backwards as a step-up converter.
 
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oldognewtrick

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What about getting a kuerig coffee pot. It will dispense hot water for tea on demand. My wife quit coffee but brews hot tea every morning.
 

Eddie_T

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When it comes to coffee I drink too much for a Kuerig I have Bonavita which simulates a pour-over and like to grind my own beans for each pot. However I have grown lazy and am using ground coffee at present. Doesn't Keurig have a current draw even when not being used?

I was thinking a hotpot would be good for a quick cup of tea or hot chocolate. Mostly I think I just like to do thing differently and shock others by telling them about it.
 

homerowner

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Walmart will have a wide selection of electric kettles. Currently I'm using a CHEFMAN brand, this was purchased for an elderly neighbor but turned out to be to big (i.e. heavy) for her. I swapped it with the smaller one we had been using for a few years now, lighter in weight, less capacity.

I gravitate towards the glass / stainless constructed kettles. Not a big fan of boiling water in plastic.

They do not heat as fast as the type you'll find in Russia, the UK, other high voltage countries. But it's still quick.

Don't spend more than $30 on one, unless you want to regulate the temp of the water.
 

Flyover

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I really like the one I've had for a couple years now: Flyover's kettle at amazon

It seems to be unavailable anymore but there are others like it at a similar price point. (I paid $29.99.)

It's durable and ergonomic, and I like the gooseneck spout for doing precise pour-overs, plus the fact that I can set it to bring the water to any temperature from warm to boiling*. There's also a readout of whatever is the current water temp inside the kettle. I only wish the lid flipped up instead of being a pull-off, but that's not that big a deal.

It heats rather quickly, I think. If I fill it quite full of cold filtered water and bring that to a boil I'd say it probably take 2-3 minutes. It probably varies depending on your elevation and what's in your water.

*Water for coffee should be between 190 and 200. For herbal tea, 175. For black tea, 212.
 
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Eddie_T

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My only interest was the warp speed of the Russian kettle. I can use the microwave for a cuppa.
When I was doing pour-over coffee I learned the sound of my copper kettle just before the boil. I always admired the look of the Chemex but settled for the low cost Tricolator. Now I use a Bonavita and can't tell any difference from my pour-over.
 
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