Electric outlet on a concrete floor

Discussion in 'Electrical and Wiring' started by gedgoudasl, Jul 6, 2011.

  1. Jul 6, 2011 #1

    gedgoudasl

    gedgoudasl

    gedgoudasl

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    I neglected to plan for electric outlets in the concrete floor of my basement den. I have run an extension cord under the carpet but I need suggestions regarding a proper electrical plug-in device that would be surface mounted and look nice. The proposed plugs would be for table lamps in the middle of the room, away from walls and columns. Any suggestions.
     
    Last edited: Jul 7, 2011
  2. Jul 7, 2011 #2

    kok328

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    Anything that is going to be a surface mount will automatically create a trip hazard.
    A cable bridge will lessen that effect but, still doesn't look nice.
     
  3. Jul 7, 2011 #3
    Why can't you run PVC along the baseboards? No trip hazard, and it is enclosed. Your plugs will also be on the walls.
     
  4. Jul 11, 2011 #4
    Seems like it would be common sense. I wouldn't want a plug in my floor any way, what if you spill something? Or need to steam clean? What if Spot walks over it and a nail goes into the hole? I hope you don't have children, as this being in the floor will surely draw some attention from a small child in the home.
     
  5. Jul 11, 2011 #5

    slownsteady

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    A swag lamp is a lamp that hangs from the ceiling. You could mount one right over the table. Fashion statement aside, the electric would be hidden (and installed to code) in the ceiling.
     
  6. Jul 11, 2011 #6
    PVC around your baseboards is to code as well, and may be easier than digging around in your ceiling.
     
  7. Jul 13, 2011 #7

    slownsteady

    slownsteady

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    Two valid ideas. The OP did mention the table lamp was in the middle of the room. So how does the PVC get to the table?
     
  8. Jul 14, 2011 #8

    JTGP

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    That's why that the Plug would be GFCI protected.
     
  9. Jul 14, 2011 #9

    JTGP

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    Why not re-wire the lamp with a longer cord?
     
  10. Jul 14, 2011 #10

    nealtw

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  11. Jul 14, 2011 #11
    GFCI or not, you're going to feel a jolt. Ask me how I know?
     
  12. Jul 15, 2011 #12

    JTGP

    JTGP

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    Well just to cover your self better Install a Arc fault breaker in the panel. Milli-amps will kill!
     
  13. Aug 3, 2011 #13

    Johnboy555

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    I don't know what these guys are reading???

    After the floor is in there is no way to easily provide an outlet in the center of the room. The floor would have to be cut up and a new line run to a outlet box and cover that is designed to be installed in a concrete floor! Then the concrete would have to be redone. Come on GUYS...READ the post before you comment!
     
  14. Aug 4, 2011 #14

    oldognewtrick

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    Your right, the best way is to cut the concrete and run the new service. I think the responses were to give the OP an alternative to busting up the concrete. At least thats what I got from it...
     
  15. Aug 4, 2011 #15

    Johnboy555

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    Hey "Old Dog" I'm an old dog too. Been doing home repairs for 36 years. It's not easy doing some things AFTER it's done. I once worked on a job of building a "Club" back in Illinois and the bar was installed. Almost 30 feet of beautiful bar and all the tile work done. When they came in to install the beer taps and misc. They found that there was no piping to run the lines from the cooler to the bar!! Someone screwed up big and it cost about $20,000 to tear up the tile and concrete to run the 4" PVC runs for the hoses!!! Think of what you want to accomplish and make sure to make a schedule!!
     

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