Enclose area under house

Discussion in 'Framing and Foundation' started by jmg1213, Aug 15, 2014.

  1. Aug 22, 2014 #41

    nealtw

    nealtw

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    Yes the rim should be double.
     
  2. Aug 22, 2014 #42

    jmg1213

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    The deck is the same level as the house floor; there is no step down.
     
  3. Aug 22, 2014 #43

    jmg1213

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    The house is located in a sparsely populated county, about 8000 people when the house was built in 1993 and only about 7500 now. As such, I am sure the building codes are loosely enforced, so it probably explains the deficiencies in the construction. I want to take this opportunity to make improvements along with the intitial project discussed here.
     
  4. Aug 22, 2014 #44

    slownsteady

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    I don't think anyone is suggesting you rebuild the deck. It's more of an exercise in observation.
     
  5. Aug 22, 2014 #45

    bud16415

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    The only statement you made so far and also all the advice given so far that I have any concern about is the issue of a sway you can feel. I recently built a low deck about 3’ height and I really gave it the shake test about half way thru and could detect a very little sway and I went for the cross bracing. In your case with the height and the weight not to mention the expense and safety I would be really studying what I wanted to do about that before anything else. Even some iron work with turnbuckles might be in order. I was also thinking and Neal and others might have a better input on this but to allow max head room below maybe a ledger made from ironwork on both sides with clips welded in for the joists and maybe even ends to except the cross ties for the sway.
     
  6. Aug 22, 2014 #46

    nealtw

    nealtw

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    The walls will do all thatand he may add a wall mid house at the end of the new floor, there will be no movement.
     
  7. Aug 23, 2014 #47

    jmg1213

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    I checked and the 6x6 posts do not have the cuts in them.
     
  8. Aug 23, 2014 #48

    nealtw

    nealtw

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    You will want to talk to some local lumber yards to see if they could be full treated for gound contact. A closer inspection would be in order at gound level and mayber something else could be added to protect them.
    http://www.oldhouseauthority.com/archive/wood_rot
     
  9. Aug 25, 2014 #49

    jmg1213

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    I will check on getting the posts additional treatment or other options to prevent/reduce any future rotting. I don't want to rebuild the deck, but any suggestions of improving what is there (if possible) is appreciated. I have found information on permanent wood foundations. Neal, though what you are suggestion isn't exactly the same this, I think there are some things I can incorporate. Would laying a gravel base be a good idea? How about using a vapor barrier as mentioned earlier, and have it come out and wrap up the sides of the 6x6s running between the post? Here is a picture from Southern Pine PWF guide, which shows construction for a basement but seems relevant.

    PWF-basement.jpg
     
  10. Aug 25, 2014 #50

    slownsteady

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    coincidentally, the phone company recently put in a couple of new poles not far from my house. I looked carefully at them and they are not scored (incised). They are actually rather smooth. I wonder if the technology has changed.
     
  11. Aug 25, 2014 #51

    nealtw

    nealtw

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    When I worked in a treatment plant many years ago, all timber was incised and green poles were if the were fir but most poles were cedar and treated with penta, the brown stuff. Incising a pole was fun, it was like swinging a sludge hammer that stuck where you put it.
    But yes treatment might be different for different wood.
     
  12. Aug 25, 2014 #52

    nealtw

    nealtw

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    The poly wraping the timber on the ground ,I thinjk yes. You wouldn't bring it up onto the sheeting like they did. Your sheeting will want house wrap so vapour can get out.
    I think they build all that with treated and you won't need that just the stuff that sits on the ground and could get wet for insurance..

    I think we can come up with something to correct the deck. Are the deck boards screw or nailed down? I wiish they had come into the 1900s when they built it.
     
  13. Aug 25, 2014 #53

    jmg1213

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    The deck is nailed.
     
  14. Aug 25, 2014 #54

    nealtw

    nealtw

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    You will first want to have a close look under the deck board from under where they meet the joist against the house and make sure there is no flashing there.
    If it's not there you want to open the insulation cover and inspect the rim floor joist for water staining and softness, use a screwdriver or awl if you have something like that. Yes all of it.
     

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