Expected savings from insulation

Discussion in 'General Home Improvement Discussion' started by drschwartz, Mar 9, 2009.

  1. Mar 9, 2009 #1

    drschwartz

    drschwartz

    drschwartz

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    I just had Home Depot come to my home to evaluate my roof insulation. I have vaulted ceilings so only part of the roof line can really be effected. The estimate is for 910 sq ft of R-30 insulation. I've got R-5 insulation now apparently.

    My question is how much will I save on my gas bill (in terms of units, not $$) if I increased the insulation as recommended?

    TIA,
    David
     
  2. Mar 10, 2009 #2

    glennjanie

    glennjanie

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    Welcome David:
    It is near impossible to state the exact savings with the new insulation but, rest assured, it will show up nicely on your energy bill. You will also notice your furnace running less and a more even temperature in the space. You will actually feel the difference.
    Glenn
     
  3. Mar 10, 2009 #3

    drschwartz

    drschwartz

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    Thanks for the response Glenn. The quote was for $1300 with a ~$250 tax credit but the issue is that our gas bill really isn't much and we're only planning to stay in the house 2-3 more years. Now if there was a great way of reducing my electric bill, then you're talking!!

    A ~$20/mo savings (if that) really doesn't justify the investment.

    Thanks again,
    David
     
  4. Mar 10, 2009 #4

    jdougn

    jdougn

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    Welcome David,

    Consider have an energy audit done by a certified proffessional. This company is based in Washington and may be close. Green Energy Management, Inc.
    A proffessional energy audit will include thermal evaluation of all doors, windows, floors, walls, and ceilings. Also, a blower door test that identifies were drafts are entering the house. And it will check for furnace air flow problems. Often these tests identify areas that need a simple fix to drastically reduce home energy consumption.
    However, if you're only going to be in the house a couple years then you are correct in not wanting to spend a lot of money on long-term payback upgrades.
    hth, Doug
     
  5. Mar 10, 2009 #5

    travelover

    travelover

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    Do you have gas or electric heat? If electric, this could be pretty cost effective, especially if you just bought the material and did it yourself, which is easy.
     
  6. Mar 20, 2009 #6

    GBR

    GBR

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    Hi David, I may be posting this late, but nevertheless important. Have them or someone, seal all the gaps around any penetrations to living space with foam or caulk first. Around hot lights or vents, use fire-rated products.
    Be sure your fan exhausts are taped and insulation wrapped. Are the skylights insulated? If blown-in, check they used what you payed for (12"-16"- ?).
    Are your soffits vented, are there insulation baffles in place to the roof sheathing?
    It's a lot easier to do these things now, rather than after (when you can't see the truss or ceiling joist tops). GBR in WA
     

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