Extending Wifi up hill.

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swimmer_spe

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My property slopes such that the roof of the house is lower than the road. I notice on that side of my yard, my wifi signal is crappy, and I think it is due to it being lower than grade. Any ides how to make it better?
 

Hal201

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You can also move the router to the center of the house. If the problem still isn't resolved, update the router to a newer model or have a wifi extender installed in your house. Hope this helps out a bit.
 

Snoonyb

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I installed an extender, with an antenna, on a house with a metal roof. A length of ABS, and some coax, cured internet and cordless phone performance.
 

Kenji

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Hello, I am new here but this is right up my alley. I am a novice home repair DIYer but work in IT, and Tech is one of my fortes.

This requires some information without getting too technical or confusing. Who is your service provider? Comcast? Verizon? Are you using their router? Do you know what the wifi standard is by any chance? Do you know if it's 801.11a/b/g or n? Newer standards are ac and ax.

Knowing that will better arm you for choices. A lot of people have already made good suggestions which I am basicallly just repeating with a little more detail. You can get a repeater or extender. It will increase your wifi signal. I have to do this as my fiber leads into the basement and the router is in the basement which is partially above ground. Yet I have a lot of interference on the upper floors and needed to add an extender. You can also use an old router if you have one on hand. Also, it won't hurt to by a repeater with a newer and faster standard llike 802.11ax. It will help you "future proof" and is backward compatble for older standards - meaning say your router and all your wifi cards in your laptops, phones, and desktops are all 802.11n. It will seamlessly work with your existing network.

In networking, it basically works as fast as the weakest link. That's all the newer standards are - they have greater range and faster speeds. So if you get an AC repeater, it will just downgrade to the N speeds of your network. Hopefully I am not being too detailed or confusing. I try to explain things as best as I can.

Here are 2 goodexamples:

TP-Link has this affordable and small unit for around $25


tplink wifi ext.png

Asus RP-AC1900 wifi extender


asus wifi ext.png

This Asus is similar to the one I use - mine is an older model. It is more expensive and currently out of stock but due back in soon. Also, it has a coupon code attached to it for like 25% off. It is more robust powerful and fully featured, but might be unnecessary for your needs. It depends on your current network, needs, etc,

Hope this helps. Definitely update us on what you do. I'll be around if you have any question. I am new here but hope to learn a lot and help as I can.

Cheers,

Kenji
 

swimmer_spe

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Hello, I am new here but this is right up my alley. I am a novice home repair DIYer but work in IT, and Tech is one of my fortes.

This requires some information without getting too technical or confusing. Who is your service provider? Comcast? Verizon? Are you using their router? Do you know what the wifi standard is by any chance? Do you know if it's 801.11a/b/g or n? Newer standards are ac and ax.

Knowing that will better arm you for choices. A lot of people have already made good suggestions which I am basicallly just repeating with a little more detail. You can get a repeater or extender. It will increase your wifi signal. I have to do this as my fiber leads into the basement and the router is in the basement which is partially above ground. Yet I have a lot of interference on the upper floors and needed to add an extender. You can also use an old router if you have one on hand. Also, it won't hurt to by a repeater with a newer and faster standard llike 802.11ax. It will help you "future proof" and is backward compatble for older standards - meaning say your router and all your wifi cards in your laptops, phones, and desktops are all 802.11n. It will seamlessly work with your existing network.

In networking, it basically works as fast as the weakest link. That's all the newer standards are - they have greater range and faster speeds. So if you get an AC repeater, it will just downgrade to the N speeds of your network. Hopefully I am not being too detailed or confusing. I try to explain things as best as I can.

Here are 2 goodexamples:

TP-Link has this affordable and small unit for around $25


View attachment 26035

Asus RP-AC1900 wifi extender


View attachment 26036

This Asus is similar to the one I use - mine is an older model. It is more expensive and currently out of stock but due back in soon. Also, it has a coupon code attached to it for like 25% off. It is more robust powerful and fully featured, but might be unnecessary for your needs. It depends on your current network, needs, etc,

Hope this helps. Definitely update us on what you do. I'll be around if you have any question. I am new here but hope to learn a lot and help as I can.

Cheers,

Kenji
I will start off with saying I am in Canada and am on Eastlink.
 

Kenji

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Hey Swimmer. Canada huh? Well I am in southern New York on Long Island by the city. NY is bigger than people think and it borders two provinces as you know, Quebec and Ontario. Canada is huge so maybe you're out west. People forget about New Brunswick, New Foundland, Nova Scotia, etc. They are quite far off but large in their own right. So I am guessing you might be in a rural area and are using your service provider's modem/router. I am not familiar with Eastlink but that doesn't really matter. All of these service providers are about the same.

Anyway, you should try that TP-Link Range extender or something similar. It isn't very expensive and is easy to return. You basically set it up by "attaching it" to your existing router with your existing credentials. That is, you use the same administrative username and password to set it up. So if your SSID, or wifi name is "Canada wifi" you can name your extender "Canada wifi_RPT" and expand your wifi signal and coverage, and connect far off devices to the extender.

Hope this helps.
 

Hal201

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Please feel free to join this group. You might find useful tips and info here as well.
 

beachboui

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The Wi-Fi signal radiates perpendicular to the antenna. To get slightly better range uphill, simply tilt the antenna so that the perpendicular angle points more uphill. As for Wi-Fi range extenders, note that extending a crappy Wi-Fi signal is not very good solution.
 

68bucks

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I'm using Ubiquiti equipment to mesh around my property. It's prosumer grade equipment and is a mesh not an extender. Been pretty happy with it.
 

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