favorite / least favorite brand of tools

Discussion in 'Tools' started by cheesefood, Jan 4, 2008.

  1. Jan 4, 2008 #1

    cheesefood

    cheesefood

    cheesefood

    Ask me bout homebrewtalk.

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2007
    Messages:
    45
    Likes Received:
    1
    Which brands that you've used do you truly like or dislike? I know there are a lot of Ryobi haters out there and Black & Decker haters. I'm interested in seeing how many casual vs hard-core handymen have a strong opinion on brands.
     
  2. Jan 5, 2008 #2

    ToolGuy

    ToolGuy

    ToolGuy

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2007
    Messages:
    482
    Likes Received:
    2
    I'm not one to hate Ryobi or B&D, but they're really designed for the do-it-yourselfer, not for the daily abuse a professional would put it through. As for my favorite, it depends on the type of tool. Overall, I'd have to say Bosch, but if the same tool made by Milwaukee or Makita is cheaper I'd probably go for the savings. Some brands you couldn't pay me to take would include Pro-Tech, Campbell Hausfeld (air tools) and Wen.
     
    CallMeVilla likes this.
  3. Jan 5, 2008 #3

    wightie13

    wightie13

    wightie13

    Member

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2008
    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    0
    I agree, it really depends on the use. When I worked in daily in construction it better be the name brand so it lasts. Now that all I do is work around the house (and have 2 kids so not much $$ to spend on tools) using the lower end tools work fine if you are willing to live with the minor issues.
     
  4. Jan 13, 2008 #4

    Daryl in Nanoose

    Daryl in Nanoose

    Daryl in Nanoose

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2006
    Messages:
    769
    Likes Received:
    9
    Most hated would be King Canada and skill
    Most liked King Industrial, Makita Porter-cable.
     
  5. Jan 14, 2008 #5

    ToolGuy

    ToolGuy

    ToolGuy

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2007
    Messages:
    482
    Likes Received:
    2
    For woodworking, I recently bought a mortising drill press and a tennoning jig (for my table saw) made by Steel City - a made in China brand. I'm generally opposed to anything made in China, purely for quality reasons, but I gotta say I'm impressed with these two.
     
  6. Jan 19, 2008 #6

    asbestos

    asbestos

    asbestos

    Good with caulk

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2006
    Messages:
    244
    Likes Received:
    3
    Anything that is made by harbor freight is an abomination
     
    CallMeVilla likes this.
  7. Jan 19, 2008 #7

    ToolGuy

    ToolGuy

    ToolGuy

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2007
    Messages:
    482
    Likes Received:
    2
    Correction: Anything imported by harbor freight is an abonimation. :D
     
  8. Jan 19, 2008 #8

    CraigFL

    CraigFL

    CraigFL

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2006
    Messages:
    409
    Likes Received:
    0
    Addition/change to that... "Anything imported by Harbor Freight may be an abonimation but have a specific useful one-time or limited use."

    No one will ever convince me that my set of six brass drifts from Harbor Freight I bought on sale for $6.99 was a bad deal. I couldn't have rebuilt my transmission without them!

    The key is- Be VERY careful what you buy from them!
     
  9. Jan 19, 2008 #9

    travelover

    travelover

    travelover

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2007
    Messages:
    693
    Likes Received:
    2
    I found an interesting thread on Weldingweb called "tools from Harbor Freight that don't suck".

    http://www.weldingweb.com/showthread.php?t=3165

    I think we'd all agree that their tools are not high quality, but what about when you just need something light duty for a short time? For instance I bought a diamond blade wet saw to do a bath renovation for about $50 - less than I could rent it for. It worked out just great for me. I also bought a 4 1/2 inch grinder for $15. Heck, if it worked for one hour I'd be happy, and so far it seems just fine.

    This might be an interesting subject to explore since the welders site concentrated on metal working tools.
     
  10. Jan 19, 2008 #10

    Daryl in Nanoose

    Daryl in Nanoose

    Daryl in Nanoose

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2006
    Messages:
    769
    Likes Received:
    9
    With the flooding of tool Manufactures I think home work is vital to good purchases and know matter where you buy they all have good and bad..
     
  11. Jan 21, 2008 #11

    rjarrett001

    rjarrett001

    rjarrett001

    Member

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2008
    Messages:
    19
    Likes Received:
    1
    All my work is DIY around the house and woodworking projects, and I am very happy with my Ryobi tools. I use the One+ 18v cordless system and have several other Ryobi tools that I am very happy with. I don't have the disposable income to get the high end items and, as Toolguy said, for my use Ryobi is great.
     
    nunyabiz1 likes this.
  12. Jan 21, 2008 #12

    ToolGuy

    ToolGuy

    ToolGuy

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2007
    Messages:
    482
    Likes Received:
    2
    Actually there are a few guys in the professions who use Ryobi tools. The guy who taught me stairbuilding swore by his 18V Ryobi drill for driving 3" screws in hardwoods. Well... till he tried my DeWalt impact driver :D. But Ryobi and similar brands are pretty good tools.
     
  13. Jan 21, 2008 #13

    CraigFL

    CraigFL

    CraigFL

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2006
    Messages:
    409
    Likes Received:
    0
    "...Well... till he tried my DeWalt impact driver...

    Now my DeWalt is one of MY favorite tools....
     
  14. Jan 21, 2008 #14

    ToolGuy

    ToolGuy

    ToolGuy

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2007
    Messages:
    482
    Likes Received:
    2
    Actually, I'd like to get some of the Milwaukee V28 tools, or the Bosch 36 volts, but I have to finish a couple more jobs first. But those are way more than most DIY homeowners need.
     
  15. Jan 21, 2008 #15

    Kerrylib

    Kerrylib

    Kerrylib

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2006
    Messages:
    157
    Likes Received:
    0
    I have to say I have been quite happy with any Dewalt tools I've used. Also Milwaukee tools. I'm sure any of the "Brand" names are going to give any DIYer a lifetime of use. I haven't got personal experience with them, but everything I have read indicates the Ryobi tools make excelent DIYer tools based on price/performance. Also it sound like the company stands behind them pretty well.

    I have an old Dewalt drill/circ saw combo set that needs new batteries, but they keep chugging away. At work we have about a dozen Dewalt drills for around the shop, Dewalt chop saw that sees more time at ppl's homes for remodeling work than actual compay work.

    I own a Ridgid table saw. Was their basic model when I bought it, stamped steel side tables rather than the cast iron. Has been a very solid saw. Quiet, little vibration, accurate. I added their mobile caster set. Very quick and easy to roll around the garage/shop.

    Look for SOLID worktops on stationary tools. Any tool fence should be extremely ridgid to make sure you don't get deflection when using the tool. Not only does that lead to poor performance, it can be very dangerous.

    It all comes back to the saying "You get what you pay for."
     
  16. Jan 30, 2008 #16

    Hack

    Hack

    Hack

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2007
    Messages:
    194
    Likes Received:
    3
    I think the tool brand that you buy depends on what you intend to do with that particular tool, how you need it to perform, and how much money you have to spend.

    For example, I use my tablesaw all the time, and I expect it to perform extremely well. I bought a 3HP Delta Unisaw (left tilt) with Biesemeyer fence.

    On the other hand, I don't have much use for a circular polisher except for the occasional buffing of the gelcoat on my boat, or buffing the interior surface of my clawfoot tub, so I purchased the Chicago Electric dual speed from Harbor Freight for $30. It may only last 100 hours, but that will take me about 10 years...
     
    slownsteady likes this.
  17. Jan 20, 2009 #17

    sequimrehab

    sequimrehab

    sequimrehab

    Member

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2009
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    0
    I recieved the ridgid 24v combo 2 mo. ago and i'm happy.
    The drill does seem a little heavy, my wife got it for my birthday.
    So even if they end up being crap i'm stuck with them.
     
  18. Feb 1, 2009 #18

    MoreTime

    MoreTime

    MoreTime

    Member

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2009
    Messages:
    15
    Likes Received:
    0
    I looked at some websites that done some individual testing without any interest in any particular tool and Bosch was found to be the best, with Dewalt running a close second and followed by Mikwaukee this was all in the 18volt series now we have 24 and 36V LiIon batteries the best purchase may be the homework. I personally own Dewalt and have had really good service out of it. good luck
     
  19. Mar 19, 2009 #19

    Johnboy555

    Johnboy555

    Johnboy555

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2007
    Messages:
    52
    Likes Received:
    0
    Youse Guys kinda got off the original thread...but I ws just at Harbour Freight this weekend and there's always something I need there. A digital caliper for $10 bucks and other kinds of cr*p but ...their power tools are not up to hard work.
    Anyway.. I've been a professional Handyman for 35 years now and I've tried all kinds of tools. I'm a one man operation and a firm believer in "If gas or electricity can do it .. Let it!" In the 35 years I've had Dewalt, Bosch, Mikita, Black & Decker, Ridgid, Milwaukee, Porter Cable and Ryobi *and prob. a few others. To tell you the truth I've had very good luck with the Ryobi cordless 18V line. I can hear somebody sighing out there, but really..for the "cost V. dependability" you can't beat them. To buy the same tool with the DeWalt name on it I'd spend twice the money. I've had a number of DeWalt cordless drills and within a year (on 2 of them) I've had to replace the trigger switch (at $35-$45 each). I must have 10 of theRyobi "One" tools, drills, impact driver, recip.saw, sprial saw,hammer drill, fan (for when I'm up in an attic) angle drill, and about 4 flashlights (they throw that in the combo sets!)lol and the lith-ion batteries are great. I use my tools every day and the only one I was disapointed in was the sprial saw (the bearing screams, but I do cut a lot of drywall with it).
    I got one of their "foldup table saws and I don't do much "construction" work I've been ver happy with it. It's accurate, light weight, handles a datto blade and at $249 a pretty good buy.

    I don't know what I'd get if I were setting up a "shop" but for cordless or to get the job done, I"m very happy with the Ryobi tools I have.
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2009
  20. Mar 19, 2009 #20

    Daryl in Nanoose

    Daryl in Nanoose

    Daryl in Nanoose

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2006
    Messages:
    769
    Likes Received:
    9
    The only Ryobi I have owned is there portable table saw and I love it. It folds up nice, has feet levelers and even a dust collector hook up and a bag. It is still light enough not to get a Hernia but has wheels to. I find it has lots of power for what I use it for.
     

Share This Page