Fix or replace? Mansfield Toilet Flush Valve - Fix!

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try2diy

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I have once again come across a frustrating happenstance, where an older household item eventually needs some sort of repair, only to find that it is nearly impossible to find a *simple* replacement part and thus one must do a near or total replacement of an item for want of a painfully simple part.

My home came with Mansfield toilets. There is a flush valve that is a bell below a long tube that rides up and down on a metal pipe. The tube is centered on the metal pipe by three plastic projections from the inner edge of the tube, at 120 degrees from the others.



Over time, those plastic projections wear away, and the flush valve no longer centers when it drops and doesn’t seat and seal.


I thought that this part should be available. Nope. One has to buy the whole assembly necessitating removing the tank to replace the tank portion as well as the flush valve portion. The center metal pipe is now a plastic triangular rod. Yay.

I was convinced that I must have a spare something that could remedy this, so I checked my parts bins. I found a single hole rubber stopper... Eureka.


I had to drill out and enlarge the center hole of the stopper to match the diameter of the metal tube and I also had to Dremel off the plastic projections in the flush valve.


I slid the rubber stopper to the bottom of the pipe, large end down, and replaced the flush valve.

Unfortunately I found that the flush valve would shift sideways and hang on the upper surface of the stopper. Digging in the parts bins again, I found a 3" length of clear plastic tube from an old aquarium filter that was the right size to fit over the narrow end of the stopper, and extend far enough up so that the flush valve stayed centered on it.


With this plastic pipe in place the flush valve would rise up to drain the tank, and then slide down and seat properly. No disassembling the tank from the bowl and removing the tank portion of the flush valve. Yay!

Not sure if this will help anybody, but on the chance it does...
 

Snoonyb

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How long did the project take and how many people would have the parts, and tools, to remanufacture and reassemble VS simply pulling the tank and changing the flush valve?
 

try2diy

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Hmmm. looking for / pondering parts, well 30 min+/- But for others on this forum it will be presumably be *quicker* since they know what to get at an ace hardware store. That's why I gave specific directions and parts. This is the DIY forum; folks have drills and dremels, no? The whole thing took a lot less time then removing the tank. I did a year ago when the 3 bolts that hold it down corroded and had to be replaced because they were allowing water to leak. That took way more time than this. Sponging out the residual water. freeing the corroded bolts in an awkward and limited space, etc. But hey, why not just call a plumber while you're at it. Again, I thought this was the DIY forum. My mistake.
 

inspectorD

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Hey, sounds like a good repair.
I'm always one to rebuild something if its feasible. You never know unless you try.
Glad its working out for you, thanks for sharing!
Last I checked.... this is a DIY site...;)
Sounds like you did it yourself:)
 

Snoonyb

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You are absolutely correct, it is a DIY forum, and it's why I asked.
You see, I stopped at an ACE is the Place, picked up a flush valve, filler, bolts, tank gasket flex line and 1/4 turn angle stop, changed everything out in a little under 45min.

The tools were a towel, sponge screwdriver and channel locks.
 

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