Flooring options for basement floor?

Discussion in 'Flooring' started by ilyaz, Jan 27, 2019.

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  1. Jan 27, 2019 #1

    ilyaz

    ilyaz

    ilyaz

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    We're restoring our finished basement after a flood. The contractor will be removing the original asbestos tile from the floor and then installing new flooring onto the concrete underneath.

    The basement is separated into 3 rooms: a guest bedroom, my "man cave" which is a workshop of sorts and a general/storage area. So the intended use of each area is a bit different. I might go for different flooring options for the different rooms but I prefer to choose one option to keep things simple. I do want some sort of waterproof floor in case of another flood.

    The contractor is recommending vinyl with cork back (https://www.flooranddecor.com/search?q=vinyl cork) as the best option. I am wondering if it really is the best. It costs about $2.80/sf. Is vinyl the best water proof option? What are my options for less money than the $2.80 and what are their advantages/disadvantages compared to the vinyl+cork? For example, vinyl + rubber or something else entirely.

    Thank you!
     
  2. Feb 25, 2019 #2

    pjones

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    Bumping this to the top, my parents are looking for flooring options also and are doing a similar install. Hopefully someone here has experience with the different types of flooring to know the best option for this application.
     
  3. Feb 25, 2019 #3

    joecaption

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    #1, Why are you having the old flooring removed?
    That's a big expenise that's not needed.
    It's going to cause far more if an issue by disturbing it by removing it, then just going over it with new flooring.
     
  4. Feb 25, 2019 #4

    Rusty

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    I agree with Joe. Unless the old flooring is loose, just go over it. You can cover it with almost any new floor covering.
     
  5. Feb 26, 2019 #5

    pjones

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    I can’t answer for the OP about the asbestos issue but in my parents house they are already at bare concrete. The concrete takes the heat out of the space though and makes it uncomfortable to be in. I like the idea of the cork backing on laminate but not sure that would provide the necessary insulation required to take the chill off the feet. I think their upper floor has a felt backed type of flooring that would probably do better, but it’s still pretty thin and probably wouldn’t provide much insulation.

    They use the space for many things and one of the rooms is for bike storage. Because of the utility nature of the space carpet is not really an option for them.
     
  6. Feb 26, 2019 #6

    mabloodhound

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    Not only will cork offer better insulation but it will be better on the feet if standing on the floor for any length of time.
     
  7. Feb 27, 2019 #7

    FatGans

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  8. Feb 27, 2019 #8

    Michael Armstrong

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    Laminate + water = mush.
     
    pjones and Rusty like this.
  9. Feb 28, 2019 #9

    Rusty

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    Exactly. Laminate should never go where it might get wet.
     
  10. Feb 28, 2019 #10

    slownsteady

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    The Pergo Outlast brand claims to stand up to water but I wouldn't even try other laminates in a basement. Concrete always has some moisture content. Porcelain tile probably is the ultimate choice, but vinyl click-lock planks are a very good choice. They don't prevent moisture, but they are not affected by it.
     
  11. Feb 28, 2019 #11

    mabloodhound

    mabloodhound

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    The Harmonics laminate posted above warranties it for standing water for 24 hours. I would check it out further and read some reviews.
     
  12. Feb 28, 2019 #12

    slownsteady

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    Don't know enough about Harmonics brand to dis it. But be aware that waterproof and water resistant are not the same thing. It could be that the surface is protected, but that any water that gets underneath will be a problem.
    That being said, moisture that is not allowed to evaporate underneath any floor is a potential mold problem.
     
  13. Feb 28, 2019 #13

    mabloodhound

    mabloodhound

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    I agree with that. It was mostly the surface water I was talking about. I put a nice looking laminate in our kitchen but any water that gets in a joint almost immediately swells that joint. Still serviceable but doesn't look as smooth and pretty. Next time I may try the Harmonics.
     
  14. Mar 1, 2019 #14

    Abilene Concrete

    Abilene Concrete

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    Have you ever thought about doing a concrete stain of some sort? You could do a semi-transparent or a solid color stain that would look great. It's easy to super easy to clean just needs a quick sweep or vacuum. Its a relatively cheap way to do flooring without breaking the budget.
     
  15. Mar 1, 2019 #15

    pjones

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    They have painted the concrete over with various types of paint over the years. My mom loves to paint anything that doesn’t move :)

    I fear the cleanup and removal of the old paint would be very much labor intensive and messy.
     

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