Gas Furnace Shutdown

Discussion in 'HVAC' started by sweets, Mar 20, 2007.

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  1. May 10, 2007 #21

    sweets

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    Hey Glennjanie,
    How much should I have to pay a plumber to replace a hot water heater?
    Let me know if you want to hear my story about what I have in common with James Gandolfini, the actor that plays Tony Soprano. I thought I already posted it but I don't see it here.
     
  2. May 10, 2007 #22

    glennjanie

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    Hey Sweets:
    You would think $200 would be plenty for 2 hours work, which includes getting the permit, removing the old one and installing the new one. If I were a plumber in that size market area, I would stock a truck with several of the most popular water heaters, have a phone worker/dispatcher, I would be there in 2 hours and get the job done. I would go in 2 or 3 times a week and buy the permits (to save time). If I could get 8 in a normal day for $200 each I think I would be doing well, but then, I realize the cost of living is higher there than it is where I live.
    Please do tell the strory about the Sopranos.
    Glenn
     
  3. May 10, 2007 #23

    sweets

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    Ok, here goes the "connection" I have to James Gandolfini, (Tony Soprano). Several years ago I dated this single mom, a pharmacist, originally from Livingston, New Jersey, who migrated to my neck of the woods in Jackson, (NJ). Turns out, they, James & my then girlfriend, both went to Rutgers University together, he, coming from a wealthy family somewhere up in northern NJ. He was dating a mutual friend of theirs who got killed in a car accident. She felt so bad for the guy they began sleeping together but drifted apart soon thereafter. He mentioned casually to her at the time he was thinking about going into acting but was majoring in something totally different. She showed me pictures of him on the beach with a full head of hair and a good physique. And now you know the rest of the story! Go figure!
    Sure wish I could pay you to do this job with me buddy!
    Get this one! I called this local plumber to give me a price on the job so he says he charges $50 to have a look & if I decide to have him do the job he knocks off the 50 bucks. So I ask him for a ballpark figure which naturally he can't do. The way I see it he pops by when he's in the area, gives me an outrageously high price, makes himself a quick 50 for a 10 minute coffee break. What do you think?
     
  4. May 11, 2007 #24

    glennjanie

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    Well, since I am a retired Plumber I agree completely. I was always honest with my customers and didn't charge them a full day's pay in case it would be the only call of the day.

    Glenn
     
  5. May 11, 2007 #25

    sweets

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    Glenn,
    How long would you say a gas HW heater could last? Would you tell a customer to replace one if it were not leaking? I am realy sorry to hear about the loss of your business. I see that they edit the posts here. Take a look at yours above. Would you like to communicate via my email address?
     
  6. May 11, 2007 #26

    glennjanie

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    Sweets:
    The "planned life" of a water heater is 12 years; it could last 10 to 20 years in my experience but, of course, that depends on the acidity or alkalinity of the water and the mineral content.
    Water heaters will normally accumulate 50 to 60 pounds of sediment during their life; that makes electric burners short out and gas burners to make a rumbling sound when the bubbles are comming up through the sediment, which impedes the heating of the water. I think you said yours is 24 years old. I say you have gotten your money's worth out of it. The whole bottom of it may blow out one day soon.
    The editing is done by my son who doesn't want me exposing my throat for cuting; you and I are not the only readers on here.
    Glenn
     
  7. May 11, 2007 #27

    sweets

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    I can hear the water bubbling through the sediment now. Is there any way to reduce that sediment accumulation or flush it out?
     
  8. May 11, 2007 #28

    glennjanie

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    You can hook a hose to the drain and run it to a floor drain or outside. Some of the sediment wii come out but not much of it and of course, you can't put chemicals in to dissolve the sediment. Most folks believe a blow down at least once a year will slow the collection of sediment. In both cases the water supply is not turned off, rather the pressure is srpposed to help blow it out.
    Glenn
     
  9. May 31, 2007 #29

    sweets

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    Hey there,
    Just for safety sake at least in warm weather I'd like to know what you think of shutting off both the gas main outside the house & the water main inside the house if you go away on vacation, again in the warm weather for a few days or longer. Is there any harm to the gas boiler or hot water heater?
     
  10. May 31, 2007 #30

    glennjanie

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    Hello Sweets:
    You had not been on for a while and I thought you must have been on your trip already.
    Yes, I agree, completely shutting everything down is an option to prevent any emergencies. You might also want to consider turning off the phone and electricity too, in order to save on the utility bills. Sometimes even the mimimum bill is a choker. Enjoy your trip!
    Glenn
     
  11. May 31, 2007 #31

    sweets

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    I don't know if you're joking or not cause i can't see your face but I wouldn't turn off the electric for a week or two. This is strictly for safety's sake.
     
  12. May 31, 2007 #32

    glennjanie

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    Sorry Sweets:
    I had it in my mind that you were going for a longer stay; actually I figured another country. You are correct though; the electricity needs to stay on and police even recommend timers on some lights in the house to make it look occupied.
    Glenn
     
  13. Jun 1, 2007 #33

    sweets

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    I was just posing various scenarios of going away for several days or longer. The stove & dryer have electronic pilots that don't require attention, but if I turn the boiler's & the gas water heater's pilots to the off position, do you think it would be a good idea to close the gas line outisde the house off? I'm actually thinking of putting a lock on it the way the gas company does if you don't pay your bill. And also closing the main water supply to the house off as well.
     
  14. Jun 1, 2007 #34

    glennjanie

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    Sounds like a plan to me.
    Glenn
     
  15. Jun 1, 2007 #35

    sweets

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    Do you think all the individual shutoff valves to the stove, dryer, boiler & water heater should be closed as well? And that all the gas should be bled from the lines, by running each with the main gas valve closed. This way, there is no gas left in the lines. Or will this make it difficult to start up the unit again?
     
  16. Jun 1, 2007 #36

    glennjanie

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    Just allow the pilot lights to purge the line, restarting will be no problem at all.
    Glenn
     

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