Gas line drain wait time

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum' started by tmiranda, Nov 1, 2010.

  1. Nov 1, 2010 #1

    tmiranda

    tmiranda

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    I'm going to install a new gas line tonight for our new dryer. The gas line that that does come out of the wall is capped and does not have a shutoff valve. I cannot tell where it comes from therefore I dont know where the shutoff valve is. So what I was planning on doing was turning off the gas for the entire house at the gas meter, running a new pipe up the wall with a shutoff valve and then put a hose from there to the dryer. My question is, how long will it take to drain the gas lines in the house? How long do I need to wait after I turn it off before starting work?
     
  2. Nov 1, 2010 #2

    paul52446m

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    You only have about 1/4 lb of pressure so a couple of pilots will use up the gas
    in a couple of min. Some times the outside valve does not hold 100 percent.
    have your fitting ready, and don't go away too long with out plugging it.
    Later Paul
     
  3. Nov 1, 2010 #3

    DrHicks

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    Not long at all. I would, however, suggest opening your windows.

    One thing you might run into... Here in Omaha, if you shut off your gas line the City Utilities have the meter set so it shuts down and will not come back on. It's a safety thing that, honestly, makes sense. You have to call the Utilities office, tell them what you did and that you're done, and they reset the meter. No biggie.

    I found that out the hard way, after installing a new water heater, and just about going nuts trying to figure out what was wrong. :)
     
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  4. Nov 2, 2010 #4

    Puddlesx5

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    TEST for leaks when you are done. soapy water, gas leak solution. always test gas for leaks after working on the pipe.
     
  5. Nov 2, 2010 #5

    tmiranda

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    I ended up doing it last night before I read all these lol. I turned off the gas at the meter and then left for the hardware store. i figured that was enough time. Apparently in Wichita we do not have to call the utility company as the gas came back on just fine. The whole project took only about 45 min including a trip to local Ace hardware store. I did have a scare at first. After I got the dryer hooked up to the gas line I went back to the meter and turned the gas back on. I went and turned on the dryer and then I went over and lit the pilot on the water heater. After about a minute I started to smell gas. I quickly shut off the water heater and got some soap and checked all my connections and everything looked fine. (i knew it would be, i wrapped each pipe with gas line plumbers tape 3 times and tightened everything crazily tight) so i waited for about 5 minutes with the dryer on and i didn't smell the gas anymore so I went ahead and re-lit the pilot on the water heater. Everything seems fine.
     
  6. Nov 2, 2010 #6

    havasu

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    It feels good to do something by yourself, doesn't it? Good job!
     
  7. Nov 3, 2010 #7

    tmiranda

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    yes it does. thank you. ive been married less than 6 months and she has already had me replace the porch light assembly, install a new garbage disposal, get her a gas dryer, and put a new ceiling fan in the bedroom. I'm not liking how this is starting :eek:
     
  8. Nov 3, 2010 #8

    MSU Fan

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    My understanding is that you are not supposed to use plumbers tape, but rather pipe dope. Is this correct or a myth?
     
  9. Nov 3, 2010 #9

    havasu

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    They have yellow plumber's tape which is perfectly acceptable, but my preference is Rectorseal #5, which lubricates and seals tightly.
     
  10. Nov 5, 2010 #10

    DrHicks

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    On a gas line, you do NOT use that white Teflon tape. There is gas-line tape that is usually yellow.
     
  11. Nov 5, 2010 #11

    DrHicks

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    Way to go, man! By the way, there ARE certain rewards to having a wife who thinks you're pretty handy. :)
     
  12. Sep 17, 2013 #12

    Kimspetcare

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    how long to do you have to wait for the tru-blu sealant to cure before you can do the leak test?
     
  13. Sep 17, 2013 #13

    CallMeVilla

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    DrH is absolutely correct. We all have stories .... I went to a place where the gas smell was really strong and the tenant was a smoker. Yes, way. Seems they had installed a new stove and the dumbass had either used white teflon tape or NO TAPE at all on the fittings.

    The white tape was turning to a sticky goo and the unsealed fittings were bubbling when I applied testing solution.

    I threw him (and his lit cigarette) out of the place and re-sealed all the fittings properly with Rectorseal, not gas tape.

    "I wondered why there was a gas smell in the kitchen," Mr. Joe Camel said.
    I took my money and got the hell out of there.

    Oh, wait until I tell you about the overhead power lines that were arcing in the rain at his place .... another day, another story.

    BOOM.jpg
     
  14. Sep 18, 2013 #14

    Caduceus

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    Instructions should be on the label from the manufacturer for cure time or if curing is necessary. If not, a tradesman who is experienced in gas line installations should be consulted to check the work, test it and verify that it is safe. I do not recommend gas piping work to be done by DIYers.
     
    Last edited: Sep 18, 2013
  15. Sep 18, 2013 #15

    Caduceus

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    One of the reasons why I have a difficult time giving advice on gas line repairs and installations to DIYrs is because of the myths related to gas piping and the controversy that ensues when I give the advice.
    Another reason is because too many products have become available on the market to consumers, they are given the impression that it's "safe and easy" with the product and the truth is that they really don't understand the proper application of it. It creates a very unsafe situation.
    I could go on a rant about how white teflon tape is okay and what the true purpose of thread sealant is...but I won't.
    I'll just leave it at this. People who are not properly trained and educated on how to do gas line repairs and installations should not do them.
     
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  16. Sep 18, 2013 #16

    CallMeVilla

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    Well .... Caduceus, while a rant is not needed ... maybe you could calmly outline your thoughts about tape and sealants in general? How about industry standards when it comes to making sure basic repairs are done safely?

    Everybody here counts on pro's (like you) to share experience, stories, and best practices. You could stop someone from a bonehead mistake!

    A Plumbing.jpg
     
  17. Sep 22, 2013 #17

    Caduceus

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    Strange. I just posted a reply about an hour ago and it's gone. I guess glitches happen.

    Repost but a shorter story. I may have given the impression that I was being aggressive in my response above, but my matter-of-fact tone may not have translated well over text. I was, in fact, very calm but maybe a little too quick to the point and I apologize for not being more clear.
    Recent events with a close friend of mine has solidified my reasoning for not giving gas advice on the forums and recommending a professional instead. He did some work with internet advice and though most of the work was great, some very important stuff was missed and created a very dangerous situation.
    For me to outline my thoughts on PTFE and thread sealants would be contrary to what I have already stated. It would seem to others that I condone the use of it by DIYers by explaining how it should be used. I feel that there are too many pieces to the puzzle of gas line installation to safely advise on it, but these are just my opinions and anybody else can help if they choose.
    I'm not hating on DIYers, I'm a huge fan of helping friends and family as well as strangers on the forums. I just think that there should be a line drawn on certain subjects. When a person asks a question like Kimspetcare did, you have to question how knowledgeable and experienced she/he is with gas lines and how safe could the installation be without even knowing the basics of 'pipe dope'.
    Safety is always a concern with every trade, but with gas there's the surprising element of "BOOM, JUST BLEW UP A WHOLE FREAKIN' HOUSE!!" Y'know what I mean? So, I'm not hatin' on anybody. I think that a very cavalier attitude is given towards gas line repairs...even 'basic' repairs...and not enough respect towards the power of what natural gas can do.
    :D:banana::D:banana: (<----indicates non-aggressive post)
     
    Last edited: Sep 22, 2013
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  18. Sep 22, 2013 #18

    nealtw

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    I agree with Caduceus here, very little of this should be done by DIYs, it's one thing to have something not leak the day you do the work but it also has to last for years and often hidden in walls.
    It's one thing to change out a stove or hot water tank but running new lines, should not be incouraged.

    Strange. I just posted a reply about an hour ago and it's gone. I guess glitches happen.

    I have forgot to hit the post button from time to time.
     

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