Getting a deck permit, for a deck that already exists

Discussion in 'Decks & Patios' started by awe215, Sep 27, 2019.

Help Support House Repair Talk by donating:

  1. Sep 27, 2019 #1

    awe215

    awe215

    awe215

    Member

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2019
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    New Jersey
    My girlfriend and I bought a house (short sale) that requires us to fix a bunch of things wrong with the house. We've had to do various things, like fixing ripped screens etc. One of which is to get a permit for the deck and pool (which already exists!)

    We have to show the plans and materials for the deck, as well as show the footings are at the right depth.

    Should I hire a contractor to secure the permit...a handyman...an architect!?

    Thanks!
     
  2. Sep 27, 2019 #2

    Snoonyb

    Snoonyb

    Snoonyb

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2006
    Messages:
    3,703
    Likes Received:
    695
    Who made getting those permits a prerequisite? The city or the bank?

    If it's the city, ask if they are requesting that the footing depth be proven on all, or will they accept a selected random.

    Is the pool in ground or surface?
     
    awe215 likes this.
  3. Sep 27, 2019 #3

    awe215

    awe215

    awe215

    Member

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2019
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    New Jersey
    Thanks for the reply!

    The township is making us do it...it's part of the short sale. They did an inspection and came back with a list of things for us to do, to get the CO.

    I am not sure about the footings, if it is random or all.

    The pool is an above ground (surface).

    Thanks again for the reply!
     
  4. Sep 28, 2019 #4

    nealtw

    nealtw

    nealtw

    Contractor retired

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2010
    Messages:
    24,649
    Likes Received:
    3,329
    Location:
    Chiliwack BC Canada
    The bottom of the footings have to be at frost depth measure from the surface of the ground. If they are not deep enough you will be digging them all.
     
    awe215 likes this.
  5. Sep 28, 2019 #5

    Snoonyb

    Snoonyb

    Snoonyb

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2006
    Messages:
    3,703
    Likes Received:
    695
    You need a couple of sheets of typing paper and make a plot plan of the property at a scale of 1" = 10'. A plot plan is as if you are viewing from an airplane. Critical dimensions are street to house, side property lines to the house and also to the deck and rear property line to the house. Include the location of the pool.

    Then make the same style plan of the deck, at 1/4" = 1', including where it attaches to the house, Identify where the footings are, both where they are on the perimeter as well as underneath.

    Take these to the city and ask the extent of excavation they will need to verify the depth.

    They may not require you to excavate them all.
     
    awe215 and nealtw like this.
  6. Sep 28, 2019 #6

    awe215

    awe215

    awe215

    Member

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2019
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    New Jersey
    Thanks for all of the replies!

    I appreciate the advice!
     
  7. Sep 28, 2019 #7

    Michael Armstrong

    Michael Armstrong

    Michael Armstrong

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2019
    Messages:
    71
    Likes Received:
    20
    Location:
    NW Washington
    The trickiest part of the deck will be the attachment to the house - transferring the deck load to the house and flashing properly can be very complex. Most DIY decks will fail any in-depth inspection and be prone to failure. Take pictures of the deck/house attachment and see what the township will require to document what was done, or if they care at all. Google "jlc deck" for some excellent references on good deck engineering.
     
    awe215 likes this.
Tags:

Share This Page