Getting my deck refinished - is a "grit additive" worth it?

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Flyover

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We're having a pro come and refinish our deck. In the estimate he reports that the original paint had a grit additive, likely made of crushed walnut shells, designed to make the deck less slippery in rain/snow. It's an extra $200 to have that re-applied but is optional. Do you think it's worth it? Is this actually pretty normal/standard?
 

Sparky617

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My sister did her deck with the paint with an additive in it. It has held up surprisingly well. I think it can be a way to get some more years out of a pressure treated deck. I don't think I'd do it on a newish deck, but if the boards are starting to check it'll buy you more time.
 

Flyover

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Why is that? Just the extra protection of having one more coat (i.e. even a second coat of solid stain would achieve the same thing) or is there something especially protective about the grit?
 

Sparky617

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I'd be concerned with the next coat when the time comes. No personal experience to speak of to confirm my concerns.

The product I'm referring to is this one from Home Depot.

 

Snoonyb

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I would think it would be a life style consideration.

An example being; YOU wearing just shorts, and carrying a young child, steps out onto to the deck, and slips and falls. You saved the child from harm, but have injured yourself, your wife hears the commotion, and finds you withering in agony, runs a gets the iridescent orange spray paint, and sprays "NON-SKID" on your torso, before calling 911.

SO.......................
 

Flyover

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Haha, OK message clear. Is it really that slippery without a grit additive?
 

Snoonyb

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Nut necessarily, depending on the product, but why take the chance with young children.
 

1victorianfarmhouse

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I put a grit additive in the paint for my outside porch floor. The porch gets rain on it from the wind when it rains, and it does get slippery when wet. The grit gives much better traction. Only problem is, the grit tends to let some dust/dirt accumulate around it, so the porch floor looks dirty and it doesn't just hose off easily.
 

JAM

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You can buy paint additives for non-slip for around $6 per gallon. Ask them what kind of additive they are using. Some are more like $20 per gallon. $200 seems very high unless they are using a lot of paint. Most are basically sand that they just stir into the paint. I used one doing my porch. Once you have used one that is like sand, it really doesn't need to be done every time as the sand is still there. It just has another coat of paint on it, so it might be slightly smoother.
 

BuzzLOL

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X 2... I add a little sand to coatings on steps outside in the rain/snow...

Treated lumber isn't very durable any more with the new 'safe' treatments used, so a new deck should be covered with something right away if you want it to last more than a year or two... ...
 

Flyover

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Thanks again for these comments. More context:

The deck is about 12x20, so fairly large but not enormous. I don't know how old it is; it's not brand new, it's not ancient. The wood was painted or solid-stained at some point but is now quite worn, grooved, etc. None of the planks are warped or broken and the deck is nice and flat/level.
 
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