GFCI on double tap receptacle?

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WasVilla

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Bringing a house closer to code for impending sale. (1) So, the receptacle in a wet bar is 26 inches from the faucet. Needs a GFCI. Opened a the receptacle and got a surprise. The hot side of the receptacle had one black and there one neutral on the other side. Usual. BUT ... what might be the Load side had one black and TWO neutrals. That is a new one! There is a light switch in the box. (2) In the kitchen, I opened another receptacle that looks like it should be at the front end of the circuit run. Again, thinking to add a GFCI. This time, there are two neutrals but THREE hots. How does this work? How can I add the GFCIs as intended?
 

afjes_2016

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WasVilla
On the first one that you opened to replace with a GFCI
A regular receptacle does not have a "load" and "line" side - this is only so on a GFCI receptacle.
On this regular receptacle look closely and let us know if the metal tab on either side of the receptacle that connects the top and bottom screws has been removed or is in tact.
Just trying to narrow down what you have.

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Take a clear picture of this first receptacle (pulled out but not removed) that you want to replace. Hopefully you have not removed the wires yet. Please be sure you shut off the proper breaker before pulling out the receptacle for the picture.

The second one in the kitchen. Can you do the same thing? Take a clear picture of the receptacle pulled out but don't remove the wires.
 

zannej

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I would also recommend getting one of those devices you can plug in to an outlet to test if it is wired properly (while power is on). That way you will know if it is wired correctly or not.
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So if it triggers an error & you see which one is wrong, you will know to correct it when you hook up the GFCI.

As afjes said, a photo of your current wiring should help.
 

ajaynejr

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Caution: Those hand held testers you plug in and observe a series of lights (like the yellow one pictured just above) often give false readings for other errors in the wiring. I would strongly recommend getting, and learning how to use, a multimeter, preferably one with a moving needle readout.
 

JoeD

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It soulds like the receptacle might be half switched. If that is true you will need to change the setup as you can not half switch a GFCI.
 

afjes_2016

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ajaynejr
The meter with a moving needle is an analogue meter opposed to one with a number readout - digital. It is good to use analogue if phantom voltage may be present.

I really don't find that the plug in testers give false readings. They help with first line troubleshooting. The analogue meter gives you more information after you know what you are looking for.
 

BuzzLOL

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Yeah, the plug in testers can be fooled... usually can't tell if separate or combined ground/neutral wiring...
 

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