Hangin Drywall in Basement

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Rincon

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First off I apologize that this is a repeat post, however I can't seem to find the one I had been reading. I am going to hang drywall on concrete block walls in the basement. They have been sealed with some type of paint/sealer. I plan on using some size of furring strip (please suggest) by screwing to the block with tapcon screws by first gluing with construction adhesive then drilling my pilot holes through the furring strips then into the block. Is this OK. At first I was planning on just running the furring strips vertically with a slight gap between the poured concrete floor and the furring strip, however I have read somewhere that I should run a baseplate strip against the floor and the ceiling joists for the furring strips to attatch to. Is it necessary to run the top and bottom plates, or can I just hang the furring strips vertically. Also will I save time by using some type of gun (please suggest type) for attaching the furring strips to the block.
Thank You for your time!
 

ToolGuy

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The gun you're refering to is a powder actuated fastening nailer, and uses powder actuated fasteners (obviously ;)). A couple of popular brands are Remington and Hilti, but there are others. You'll have to look into which is the proper length fastener and the proper color coded loads to use, lest someone here comes along who knows.

Personally, I prefer tapcons or similar masonry screws. The threads make for a far superior hold. And it doesn't take that long to predrill and drive the screws once you get set up and going. A cordless impact driver works well for driving the tapcons.

It's common practice to do floating corners with drywall, but not using any adhesive or fasteners withing about 8 - 10 inches of the corner. This allows some slight flexibility in case of expansion/contraction. Even though, I'd still run a horizontal member across the top in case of impact, so the corner doesn't crack. Also along the bottom. It's not a lot of work or materials, and makes for a better quality job.

Here's a video that shows the floating corners technique...

http://hwtv.jlconline.com/ It's the second video if they haven't added more lately.
 

inspectorD

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I love the idea but...shooting into block ...you will end up with alot of pieces. Tapcon masonary screws are the way you need to go. Drill and glue the boards on. What I use instead of wood is steel studs. They are less expensive and easier to install. Plus they do not get moldy.
Keep the sheetrock off the floor at least an inch or two. Use durarock for a filler at the bottom if you need to for trim.
Good luck.:D
 

Rincon

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Thank You both for your advice. Once I have completed ripping out and cleaning up the old I believe I am ready now that have the know how to procede. I will check out the video.
 

ToolGuy

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Thank You both for your advice. Once I have completed ripping out and cleaning up the old I believe I am ready now that have the know how to procede. I will check out the video.
Keep us posted and feel free to throw all the questions you have our way. ;)
 

Rincon

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ToolGuy
One decision that I have been struggling with is the size of furring strip to use. I have been told 1x's or 2x's. I am hanging 1/2" DensArmor. When looking at screws I can't seem to find any 1" for attaching the drywall. I haven't gotten a chance to look at the metal studs yet. 1x's would not be as thick as 2x's and loss of 2" of floor space is is not a problem. I am a bit worried about my wall receptacles. I hope they left some slack inside the wall for me to extend them to be flush with the drywall. Any thoughts?
Thanks
 

ToolGuy

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...I hope they left some slack inside the wall for me to extend them to be flush with the drywall. Any thoughts?
Thanks
Who is they? I thought you were starting with bare cement block walls (except for the sealer).

My prefered method is to use 2x2 studs laid flat against the block every 16" on center, and attached with construction adhesive and 2-1/2" tapcons, maybe 4 or 5 per stud. Any protrusions, such as an over filled mortar joint or a crooked block, I chop away with the claw of my hammer. Then I place 1-1/2" foam board insulation between the studs. I generally use 1-1/4" screws for the drywall, but 1-5/8" will do just as well. I never use 1" screws.

Anyway, this leaves 1-1/2" depth (thickness of a 2x2) for electrical boxes. If you need deeper boxes for any reason, you may nave to chop into the block a little to accomodate them.

What inspectorD says about using powder actuated fasteners is a good point - cement block doesn't stand up to the impact very well. But about metal vs wood, I prefer wood for a few reasons. Wood has better insulation value (metal has zero), wood is more rugged, and you can fasten stuff to wood, such as a heavy mirror or shelves. I know metal is quicker and cheaper, but these are at the bottom of my priorities. You may feel differently, just a matter of preference. I like wood. :p
 

sherod

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Parents are building new construction - basement comes with drywalled ceiling - after visiting site drywallers hung drywall and left Electrical Conduit showing (butted up to or cut out around it).

Thus drywall hung to floor joists and any conduit under joists still shows.

Question - is this normal - what should we say to the builder?

I understand sewage/ductwork under the joists - however shouldn't the conduit be covered using perhaps firring strips along the joists first then drywall installation so the conduit is covered?
 

kok328

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butted up to or cut out around it must not look very good in terms of finish. I don't mind looking at conduit but, there shouldn't be any reason not to surface mount it or cover it up w/drywall. Drywallers don't mess w/electrical so they worked around it. I prefer to surface mount for future access w/o having to tear into the wall. Maybe you'll want to disconnect those circuits, pull back some wire, install a J-box up in the floor joists, splice a longer wire (probably only less than a foot, unfortunately) and run it to the original location. If your lucky, some cutback trimmings might be long enough to extend other circuits the few more inches you'll need.
Funny, I just noticed a commercial the other day where OwenCorning has insulated, mold/mildew resistant, paintable, removable panel kits for finishing basements.
 

ToolGuy

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Parents are building new construction - basement comes with drywalled ceiling - after visiting site drywallers hung drywall and left Electrical Conduit showing (butted up to or cut out around it).

Thus drywall hung to floor joists and any conduit under joists still shows.

Question - is this normal - what should we say to the builder?

I understand sewage/ductwork under the joists - however shouldn't the conduit be covered using perhaps firring strips along the joists first then drywall installation so the conduit is covered?
Hi Sherod,

Please start a new topic when posting about your own project. I don't wish to be a nag but it's not good forum etiquet to jump in a semi-related thread with your own questions. Also, will save a lot of confusion. At first I thought it was the original poster responding to my reply and almost asked what this has to do with the walls.
 

Rincon

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ToolGuy,
Might be best if I start from the beggining. The basement when we bought the house was finished. Definition of finished varies from room to room. Back side of the house not underground where the living room is they had attached brown paneling via small nails and looks like liquid nail directly to the block, and no sealer. Room in the basement on the front side of the house which is under ground they only painted the block with some type of sealer.

So I guess you say that the the walls are bare block walls with the exception of some type of white paint sealer. Paint may not be the right word, however the walls have been painted with something. Can't really say if it is sealer or paint tough.

"They" being who ever built the house 30 years ago. The wiring is ran inside the block. So if I add the 1 1/2" stud and 1/2" drywall I am adding 2" thickness to the wall. When I extend the electricsl box to be flush with the drywall I hope whomever ran the wiring originally left enough slack for me to extend. While writing this I thought about the possibility of pulling the wire back out of the top of the block and then straight down between the drywall and block wall. Wouldn't that make up for the thickness. A friend of mine tells me that I run the risk of shaving the insulatioin off and exposing the wire. Maybe I just have to be extra carefull and check it thoroughly. Anyway just a thought. Also I plan on leaving the electrical outlets where they are so I won't have to worry about putting a whole in the block to get them to fit. They are metal though, should I replace with plastic while I am in there?

Hope this isn't asking to much, I really appreciate your advice. I consider myself a capable guy, and like doing this type of work. So to save a buck or two for labor is always a plus. More for my wife and kids to have, RIGHT?!:)
 

ToolGuy

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Ah, now I get it. :eek:

Hopefully they did leave enough wire to extend the boxes. I don't see any reason to replace them with plastic, unless there is a moisture issue and they are rusting. But otherwise I would just add some extensions. If the wires are too short you could always pigtail a little extra wire onto them, seeing how you'll have some extra space for the extra wire nuts.

As for pulling the wiring out of the block and running it between the furring strips, I'm don't really see any benefit. And depending on how and where the wiring enters the block, it may not be that easy either. Unless there are any reasons to do otherwise, I would just add 1-1/2" extensions to the boxes and be done with it.
 

guyod

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I cant believe someone would go through all the trouble of installing outlets in block just to go half *** with glueing paneling to the block.

How big of a no no is it to install panelling to block?

Would t-11 be acceptable?
 

Rincon

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ToolGuy
Thanks for the info. I will proceed. I should have clean up and prep done this weekend and start hangin next weekend.

guyod
I feel the same way. Not sure what t-11 is though.
 

ToolGuy

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ToolGuy
Thanks for the info. I will proceed. I should have clean up and prep done this weekend and start hangin next weekend.

guyod
I feel the same way. Not sure what t-11 is though.
Keep us posted. We're here with ya all the way. :)
 

guyod

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T-11 is exterior grand 3/4 (i think) plywood that is used to side houses. It is tongue and groove and have a groove in it about every foot.. Im sure you have seen it maybe it is called something different in your area
 

asbestos

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If you were to run the wires behind the drywall they would be more liable to damage from nails and things.
 

Rincon

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T-11 does ring a bell. I just haven't ever used it, but I do know what it is now.

Excellent point asbestos. About the wire.

Thinking about where to start when I begin tohang the furring strips. I am thinking that the best place will be to start with the windows and doors. What do you think?
 

Rincon

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"Where to begin with the furring strips?" I meant to ask if I should frame around the doors and windows first. Also how close to the edge of the block should I get with the 2x2's? I will be using the tapcons and drilling pilot holes, however Idon't want to risk busting out the block so close the edge. Maybe Ishould use 2x4's when ever I am close to an edge that way Ican attach the strips without getting to close. Hmmmmm.
 

ToolGuy

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"Where to begin with the furring strips?" I meant to ask if I should frame around the doors and windows first. Also how close to the edge of the block should I get with the 2x2's? I will be using the tapcons and drilling pilot holes, however Idon't want to risk busting out the block so close the edge. Maybe Ishould use 2x4's when ever I am close to an edge that way Ican attach the strips without getting to close. Hmmmmm.
Tapcons are not likely to break out near the edges. However there is one good reason to use a 2x4 at an ouside corner - so it will stick out flush with the furring strips around the corner. I would use a 2x4 and a 2x2 fastened together to make an L shape on oustide corners.

Whether to work around doors and windows first is a matter of personal preferance. I like to work doors and windows as I get to them (i.e. burn that bridge when I get to it), while some might prefer to do them first, then fill in the rest of the wall. Others still might do all the full length furring strips first, for that feeling of instant gratification, then go back and do the doors and windows.
 
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