Hanging after repair

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Tcmbrendan

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I have a question about the proper way of reintroducing structural integrity to drywall after a hole is made. The scenario I am in is that I made a couple of holes too big with drywall anchors and now need to basically start again. Moving forward could I just use any type of light spackle to fill the hole and then the toggle bolts instead of the plastic wall anchors? Or should I fill it with something else besides light spackle. FYI I’m not hanging anything too heavy just a towel rack.
 

Guzzle

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The new holes should be an inch or so away from the old holes.
 

Flyover

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One trick I've used before (not to fix this exact problem but it would work) is to mount a thin strip of wood on the wall first, as kind of a backing plate. You can finish the edges or even paint it if you want. You mount this piece of wood using new holes that are, as @Guzzle suggested, at least an inch away from the old ones (even better is to mount it right into studs if you know where they are and they're not too far away), but then you mount the towel rack onto that piece of wood. This will allow you to put the towel rack in the exact spot you originally wanted, though it might be 3/8 of an inch (or however thick your backing plate is) further out from the wall.
 

Guzzle

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Your chance of hitting even one stud at random is 1.5/24 = 6%, not too good. They're never where you want them, Murphy's Law.
 

Sparky617

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One trick I've used before (not to fix this exact problem but it would work) is to mount a thin strip of wood on the wall first, as kind of a backing plate. You can finish the edges or even paint it if you want. You mount this piece of wood using new holes that are, as @Guzzle suggested, at least an inch away from the old ones (even better is to mount it right into studs if you know where they are and they're not too far away), but then you mount the towel rack onto that piece of wood. This will allow you to put the towel rack in the exact spot you originally wanted, though it might be 3/8 of an inch (or however thick your backing plate is) further out from the wall.
A piece of chair-rail backer board makes a nice backer for toilet paper holders and towel racks.
 

Tcmbrendan

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Thank you for the feedback guys. Turns out I cannot place a toggle bolt since I am right on the edge of a metal stud I believe I cannot confirm since the stud finder on my phone didn't pick it up?

The easiest solution would be to drill new holes and move the rack but unfortunately that is not an option as this would mean I would either be hitting the corner wall or the towels are hanging over toilet. Although the backing plate method may work, I would rather not have the rack be further away from the wall on that side as you suggest if possible.

Are any of these other options viable?

1. The hole is about 1/2" thick by 1.5" long by .5" deep. Could I simply find a small piece of wood to place into the cavity, drill through it, and insert molly bolt (to grab the back of the wall) and a washer to lay flush against the front of the wall. My only hesitation with this is that I'm guessing the wood would freely turn inside the cavity.

2. Same as the method above but without the wood in the cavity. A mollybolt against the back and a washer against the wall so the bolt doesn't fall through since the opening is 1/2" thick. However there is nothing holding the screw/bolt in the middle and I'm concerned it may wiggle.

3. I found a toggle wall anchor (see picture) that may also work if i fitted a washer to the front as well.

What do you all think?
 

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bud16415

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I have messed around with toilet paper holders for years coming lose as people seem to like to use them to get up. Now I bite the bullet and open the wall between the studs wide enough to get a 2x4 or 2x6 between the studs screwed in solid then patch the drywall over it and screw the holder in so it will never be a problem again.

It takes a little time but not as much in the long run.
 

Guzzle

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Could I simply find a small piece of wood to place into the cavity,

>This piece should be plywood.
 

Jeff Handy

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If you have room for wood, you have room for a big metal toggle bolt.

Post some pics of this situation.

How big are the holes?

Putting any kind of spackle or plaster into the hole and then drilling through it to mount new anchors will never work.
 

Guzzle

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Hanging stuff on drywall is almost always "structural". Patches can only hold a few ounces of downward force, no pull out or pull over force, they are "cosmetic".

A towel rack exerts pull out & pull over force, hardly any downward force.
 

Tcmbrendan

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Thanks guys for all your help. I ultimately got it fixed with one of those toggler plastic anchors that I wrapped around with a plaster pad that you dip in water. Dip the pad and wrap around the anchor and it helps to fill the hole and solidify. It worked. Probably more effort than it was worth but it feels solid enough for a towel rack.
 

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