Help! How do I repair one of these?

Discussion in 'General Home Improvement Discussion' started by MrMiz, Aug 29, 2012.

  1. Aug 29, 2012 #1

    MrMiz

    MrMiz

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    Anybody got any sage advice for repairing this:
    [​IMG]

    Hopefully that image transfers but its the bottom of a patio column on a only victorian (i think).
     
  2. Aug 29, 2012 #2

    nealtw

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    Can't see enough detail. What is the problem?
     
  3. Aug 29, 2012 #3

    MrMiz

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    the base "blueish" part is crumbling/split at the miters.
     
  4. Aug 29, 2012 #4

    MrMiz

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    after the some googling it looks like the part that is falling apart is called a "plinth". So far I have seen recommendations to replace it with and aluminum plinth that allows for air flow under to prevent corrosion. So I guess now the question is what is the normal construction of one of these columns? Is the base built up to the column? So will I need to Jack up the corner and cut the bottom lose then replace it? I'll keep googling for instructions but let me know if anybody can help or has done this before.
     
  5. Aug 29, 2012 #5

    MrMiz

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    Oh and can anybody tell me where I can buy a aluminum plinth? I've check homedepot and lowes online but it doesn't seem they have just a section/selection of aluminum plinths.
     
  6. Aug 29, 2012 #6

    MrMiz

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    Could I cast a plinth out of concrete?
     
  7. Aug 30, 2012 #7

    nealtw

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    A closer picture may be helpfull. These posts are usually hollow with a structural post holding up the roof inside it. You will want to find out if the post inside is still good hopefully it is treated wood. I would just make a new set of plynths with treated lumber.
     
  8. Aug 30, 2012 #8

    BridgeMan

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    A repair using high-strength concrete would last a lot longer than wood, even if it's pressure treated. Concrete likes water, gaining strength over time. Research has shown that 50-year-old concrete is stronger than identical specimens which are only 40 years old, as long as adequate moisture has been available for hydration of the Portland cement particles. Water is the nemesis of wood, and the porch's roof overhang probably isn't enough to keep the area dry during inclement weather.

    Just make sure to take the load off the column with temporary supports before removing the damaged material.
     
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  9. Sep 13, 2012 #9

    MrMiz

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    I'm giving it a a go with Quickcrete5000. I've got the forms setup pretty basic. I'll take some pictures and post it when I have a chance. I saw they have some stucture jacks at home depot that I think I'll pick up 2 and some 4x4's the jack up the corner and slide in the new concrete one. I took some measurements and it looks like that corner has dropped from all the other columns about 5/8ths so I'm going to construct my plinth to make up the difference. Let me know if any of you have any other thoughts, but I'm hoping this is easier than I originally thought.
     
  10. Sep 14, 2012 #10

    nealtw

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    If your columm is hollow with a post inside.
    1. If the post inside is still good and attached good you will brake something when you jack it up.
    2. If it jack up easy a close inspection will want to be done. Most often these have a post inside and they are doing the work so a spacer for that post will be need too.
     
  11. Sep 14, 2012 #11

    BridgeMan

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    Lift very slowly, and listen carefully as you lift. The column bottom should let go from the rotten plinth unless there's something tying it down, past the plinth.

    If it were mine, I'd be using a single jack-post (with screw-thread top), resting against some diagonal, temporary corner plates top and bottom.
     
  12. Sep 14, 2012 #12

    MrMiz

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    Thanks nealtw. The current plinth is broken almost in Half and I can see that the column is hollow. I can't see if there is a post inside yet because there are a bunch of plastic bags mashed up in the column but it didn't look like there was a post. I'll double check before jacking it up. I'm pretty sure the only thing holding everything in place currently is the caulking between the wood plinth and the stone.
     
  13. Sep 14, 2012 #13

    MrMiz

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    BridgeMan thanks for the info. that corner appears to be low about 3/8ths... in my Googling (yes I use it as a verb) I came across a recommendation of only moving a structure 1/8th of an inch a day to prevent "other crazyness" as I've never actually attempted to lift anything is that amount of time necessary? That would take out my weekend project just in waiting alone.
     
  14. Sep 14, 2012 #14

    nealtw

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    A 1/8" per day is for when you're worried about plaster and floors. I wouldn't worry about a porch, other than watching out for something holding it down.
     

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