Help Needed: Cracks in ceiling and between wall and ceiling.

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MissJ

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We moved in to this house 5 months ago. Within a few weeks we had the house painted and decorated. It's a 3 storey house and the issues are on the top (2nd) floor. There were some minor cracks in the plaster in the hallway and en suite ceilings which our decorator filled and painted. Within a week the cracks in the hallway and en suite had reappeared. He said it could be something to do with the boarding in the loft or the moisture in the air. The top floor of the house was very, very hot and humid in the hot weather.

Now it's starting to get colder, within the last 2 months a new crack has formed in the spare bedroom between the wall and ceiling. The room is just under 5 metres long and the crack is half the wall length and just on 1 wall.

We noticed a leak in our loft following heavy rain. We just had this fixed last week. I don't know if these cracks have something to do with moisture from the loft, or if it's something to do with how it was boarded (it's part boarded, but not over the 2 bedrooms on this floor).

I have attached pictures for reference. They don't look like they're major cracks but obviously from a cosmetic perspective we want to fix it.

Picture 1 is the crack between the wall and ceiling in the spare room (I think the loft boarding extends as far as here). Picture 2 is a zoomed in view of a part of the crack.

Picture 3 is the crack outside the spare room, but above the cupboard housing the water tank. Picture 4 is the hallway ceiling above the stairs and landing, next to the loft hatch.

Picture 5 is above the shower cubicle in the en suite to the master. Picture 6 is a crack in the ceiling of the en suite.

Can anyone tell what might be causing it, and what the best trade would be to get in to repair these?

Thanks!
 

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bud16415

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First off welcome to the forum.



It looks like a condition called truss uplift. If you do search you will find a lot to read about it and photos that look quite like yours.

Mostly people look at ways to hide it with moldings and such.
 

MissJ

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First off welcome to the forum.



It looks like a condition called truss uplift. If you do search you will find a lot to read about it and photos that look quite like yours.

Mostly people look at ways to hide it with moldings and such.
Thank you very much for the quick reply bud16415. This does look like this is our issue. We'll read up on this and then decide on the best course of action.
 

kok328

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I'd run a bead of caulk over the crack and then paint to finish. Caulk should flex with the seasons.
 

bud16415

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Thank you very much for the quick reply bud16415. This does look like this is our issue. We'll read up on this and then decide on the best course of action.
@kok328 idea is a good one some people use moldings also. After you study it a bit come back and tell us what your plan is and I’m sure we can offer more help with getting it done.
 

MissJ

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In terms of the cracks in the middle of the ceiling, do you think this is the same issue? Would caulk work with this? What trade would fix this, a painter and decorator? We're not really DIYers and want to make sure it's done properly.
 

bud16415

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In terms of the cracks in the middle of the ceiling, do you think this is the same issue? Would caulk work with this? What trade would fix this, a painter and decorator? We're not really DIYers and want to make sure it's done properly.
The elastic caulking should allow movement in the corners. It depends on how much movement you are seeing. The only way you will know for sure is to repair it with this method and wait a year and see. I have seen people chase this problem a few times before it gets resolved.



The cracks in the ceiling area have to be repaired differently. They need taped and skim coated over with a drywall compound, then feathered out by sanding and painted. There is a chance of these coming back as well, but the first cracking may have let the attachment points to ease a little and the taping should contain things.



There are two types of tape and likely paper tape was used the first time where the sheets were joined. For a repair like this I would use the fiberglass mesh tape.

It is not a hard DIY job, but I understand if working on ceilings is not your thing. Most handymen types could do this or anyone that does painting.
 

MissJ

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The elastic caulking should allow movement in the corners. It depends on how much movement you are seeing. The only way you will know for sure is to repair it with this method and wait a year and see. I have seen people chase this problem a few times before it gets resolved.

The cracks in the ceiling area have to be repaired differently. They need taped and skim coated over with a drywall compound, then feathered out by sanding and painted. There is a chance of these coming back as well, but the first cracking may have let the attachment points to ease a little and the taping should contain things.

There are two types of tape and likely paper tape was used the first time where the sheets were joined. For a repair like this I would use the fiberglass mesh tape.

It is not a hard DIY job, but I understand if working on ceilings is not your thing. Most handymen types could do this or anyone that does painting.
Thanks bud16415. Very useful information. We may try the en suite ourselves. But the hallway includes the void over the stairs so will require scaffolding or a very tall ladder.
 

billshack

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Is this a new house?
if so many new house have this sort of thing as the wood dries out.
If fact a new housing contractor that i did a lot of for used to include
a plaster contactor coming in to the house 6 months after the move in date
to replaster any cracks
 

MissJ

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Is this a new house?
if so many new house have this sort of thing as the wood dries out.
If fact a new housing contractor that i did a lot of for used to include
a plaster contactor coming in to the house 6 months after the move in date
to replaster any cracks
No, it's not a new house. It's about 13 years old.
 
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