Help with problems in basement

Discussion in 'Bricks, Masonry and Concrete' started by Tylersloan, May 9, 2012.

  1. May 9, 2012 #1

    Tylersloan

    Tylersloan

    Tylersloan

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 9, 2012
    Messages:
    48
    Likes Received:
    0
    My home was built in 1950 and the basement is made out of cinder blocks . There are at least three spots that water is coming in from .
    The worst spot is from two windows that were filled in with bricks and concrete and the other two spots are at the bottom of one wall there not as bad but still needs to be addressed .
    Ive also noticed that I have at least two gaping holes that I can see daylight threw at the top of the basement wall .
    This home has been added onto so much since 1950 and was done half arsed I know at one time all of the floor joist were scabbed over from major rot .
    Also right next to the stairs going to the basement is dirt behind a wall I have a partial wall that extends into the basement and about two foot of the permitter of the basement wall was never built . As far as I know I have a sump pump so the water dose go away but it's annoying I can't use my basement until I get her water tight . I'll take pictures and post em up
     
  2. May 9, 2012 #2

    Tylersloan

    Tylersloan

    Tylersloan

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 9, 2012
    Messages:
    48
    Likes Received:
    0
    Pictures of said basement

    image-3539318982.jpg

    image-1991373806.jpg

    image-1517439986.jpg

    image-2997857899.jpg

    image-3688211740.jpg

    image-174455594.jpg

    image-3005993857.jpg

    image-2326167030.jpg
     
  3. May 9, 2012 #3

    nealtw

    nealtw

    nealtw

    Contractor retired

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2010
    Messages:
    23,899
    Likes Received:
    3,119
    To do it right, would be dig up the outside and put in drain below floor level and repair and waterproof the walls.
     
  4. May 9, 2012 #4

    Tylersloan

    Tylersloan

    Tylersloan

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 9, 2012
    Messages:
    48
    Likes Received:
    0
    I was also thinking if I have to dig up the outside to install drains why not just demo the floor and dig down about another four feet to get proper head height as well?
    I know this won't be a DIY project but I got the house for 49,900 and its value as it sits now is 70,000 .
    Like I said the house had been added on to some time in the 70's and the new addition is on a crawl space I'm thinking of hiring a house mover to come out and not lift but just sure up the add on so I can dig out the crawl space and have a full basement .
    The home is 1,900 sq feet now and if I add that crawl space as a basement it would put it it well over 2,200 .
    The other pro I'm thinking of the only pipe under the crawl space is the main water line coming from the street the gas line is in the basement and above the crawl space is just two bedrooms and a living room .
    I really think this could be done with professional help and done right .
     
  5. May 9, 2012 #5

    nealtw

    nealtw

    nealtw

    Contractor retired

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2010
    Messages:
    23,899
    Likes Received:
    3,119
    I like that attitude, if your going to do it, do it once and do it right.
     
  6. May 10, 2012 #6

    Tylersloan

    Tylersloan

    Tylersloan

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 9, 2012
    Messages:
    48
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thank you there are some things I can do on my own but others I know better than to even try .
    Question how much would a drainage system be for a basement floor ?
    I know I would also need one on the outside as well but the thing is I have less than four feet next to my house and the house next door .
    Infact three feet of his roof is on my property zoning never noticed it !
    also I'm planning on making the back yard flat with a retaining wall and also install new gutters as well and have proper drainage to the sewer system .
     
  7. May 10, 2012 #7

    nealtw

    nealtw

    nealtw

    Contractor retired

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2010
    Messages:
    23,899
    Likes Received:
    3,119
    You can put a drainage system inside but you still have water coming thru the wall so doing it on the outside is by far better. How deep is the foundation between the houses?
     
  8. May 10, 2012 #8

    Tylersloan

    Tylersloan

    Tylersloan

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 9, 2012
    Messages:
    48
    Likes Received:
    0
    Photos of the drainage system that was installed long before I bought the home

    image-334884496.jpg

    image-4201722928.jpg
     
  9. May 10, 2012 #9

    Tylersloan

    Tylersloan

    Tylersloan

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 9, 2012
    Messages:
    48
    Likes Received:
    0
    Do you mean how much room I have between houses ? Or how thick my foundation wall is ?
    The wall is cender block 4x8 wall and the space between homes is tight and this is the worst wall

    image-1806270074.jpg
     
  10. May 10, 2012 #10

    Tylersloan

    Tylersloan

    Tylersloan

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 9, 2012
    Messages:
    48
    Likes Received:
    0
    Here is one of the worst cracks

    image-1974535343.jpg
     
  11. May 10, 2012 #11

    AlwaysOneMoreProject

    AlwaysOneMoreProject

    AlwaysOneMoreProject

    Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2010
    Messages:
    43
    Likes Received:
    0
    Does that house on the right have eaves on that side, or is that roof draining onto the ground?
     
  12. May 10, 2012 #12

    nealtw

    nealtw

    nealtw

    Contractor retired

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2010
    Messages:
    23,899
    Likes Received:
    3,119
    The down spout near the electric meter needs to be extended away from the house, and the down spouts on the house next door have to be looked at too.
    If digging between the houses is impossible I have seen the whole area between two house made to be a dry zone. It's all done below ground level, I'll see if I can find it and post a link.
     
  13. May 10, 2012 #13

    Tylersloan

    Tylersloan

    Tylersloan

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 9, 2012
    Messages:
    48
    Likes Received:
    0
    The house on the right has eves and gutters that drain into a pipe between both homes .
    If the whole spot between the homes become a dry zone I'm wondering if the home owner next door will split the bill.
    Monday I'm going down to the zoning office and take a look at the property lines and go from there
     
  14. May 10, 2012 #14

    asbestos

    asbestos

    asbestos

    Good with caulk

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2006
    Messages:
    244
    Likes Received:
    3
    Where do you live? one issue not mentioned is seismic reinforcement. un-reinforced CMU (Concrete masonry units- cinder blocks) do not perform well in an earthquake. To put it mildly.
    also I would not be surprised if the gutters did not run into perf. pipe run around the house. I have scene that done where the gutters drain into footing drains made of black perf pipe. The footing drains just distribute the water right against the foundation.
    How many drains? Well I'm from Washington state, so we do know rain. and as far as I am concerned I have yet to see a house that had too many drains or too much drainage.
     
  15. May 10, 2012 #15

    Tylersloan

    Tylersloan

    Tylersloan

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 9, 2012
    Messages:
    48
    Likes Received:
    0
    I'm in Peoria Illinois by way of Houston Texas lol
    There is black corrugated drainage pipe my home gutters and his are tied into the same pipe tomorrow I'll dig up a foot or so and see if it has holes .
    I don't know how much the ground moves but it's not un common to live on top of a old cole mine up here . I think I need to call in professional help on this I really did not want to spend 30,000 on this but I do know it can be a lot of money to seal up a basement
     

Share This Page