Holes in asphalt shingles / possible hail damage

Discussion in 'Roofing and Siding' started by kmwest, Sep 28, 2016.

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  1. Sep 28, 2016 #1

    kmwest

    kmwest

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    I did a fall roof inspection this past weekend, after we had a significant hailstorm last week (but no leaking through our upstairs ceilings that I've seen). Aside from a lot of algae and moss growing (which I plan to spray this upcoming weekend with bleach and water), I saw probably 20-30 small holes in the asphalt shingles that look like they possibly were hail damaged. I've seen a few of these months ago but there are more now (or perhaps I'm just noticing them more). An example is right in the middle of this image:

    https://1drv.ms/i/s!AldBRbQJj45ZjDn0sy5NGTfz7J2h

    1) Is this anything to worry about?
    2) If so what should I do to repair?

    Thanks
    Ralph
     
  2. Sep 28, 2016 #2

    kok328

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    1. Yes
    2. File an insurance claim.
     
  3. Sep 28, 2016 #3

    Snoonyb

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    Only if it penetrates the shingle beneath.
     
  4. Sep 29, 2016 #4

    joecaption

    joecaption

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    Hard to know what's going on with that one close up picture.
    When I see tar all over a roof I think there was an old leak.
    Done right there was no need for tar at that joint.
    Somethings just wrong about the way those two roofs were tied in together.
    Really want to file a claim, pay the deductable, may have your insurance dropped or go up for something that could be DIY fixed for about $70.00?
    Only need a flat bar and a hammer to do the repair.
     
  5. Sep 29, 2016 #5

    kmwest

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  6. Sep 29, 2016 #6

    joecaption

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    Any shingles with a hole in them need to be replaced not just patched.
     
    Mastercarpenty likes this.
  7. Sep 29, 2016 #7

    kmwest

    kmwest

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    Any good youtube videos or step-by-step instructions on replacing the shingles? I had one that was loose and just caulked it back into place, then nailed and caulked over the nail. This will be my first time with a full shingle replacement and I am concerned about really screwing it up.
     
  8. Sep 29, 2016 #8

    Snoonyb

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    1st question; Do you have any of the shingles, or, are they still available in the color?

    The instructions a pretty simple and as recommended, a flat bar and a hammer are a good start.
     
  9. Sep 29, 2016 #9

    kok328

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    Amazing what you can see on a computer instead of a scratched up Iphone screen protector.

    Might want to hang up the phone with the insurance claim, especially at 3 in the morning and she sound hideous. :nono:
     
  10. Oct 18, 2016 #10

    kmwest

    kmwest

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    So, an update.

    Insurance adjustor came out and said no, no haildamage that he saw but he things that the scratched shingles on the bottom of the roof by the gutters are due to a roof rake and should be replaced.

    I had a roofing contractor here tonight to quote repairing a fascia board that was rotting out, and while they were at it to replace those shingles. He gets up on the roof to look at the shingles and surprise surprise I need a new roof due to nails being overdriven and old vents.

    I am pretty skeptical - while I understand an insurance adjustor may not be the best person to trust to say "everything's fine" he spent a whole lot more time up there than this salesman did, and he isn't trying to sell me anything.

    Advice? Of course I'm not going to just drop $7k after a 30 minute scare job but I also don't want to ignore what could be a real problem. Besides one loose shingle that I glued and nailed last summer no work has been done on this roof in the 2 years I've owned the house. The sellers put on the disclosure that it was over 8 years old.

    Thanks - I appreciate all the help I get on this forum. My education and life experience gave me no useful skills besides typing on the Internet :)

    Ralph
     
  11. Oct 18, 2016 #11

    oldognewtrick

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    Ralph, get at least two more estimates.
     
  12. Oct 18, 2016 #12

    inspectorD

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    What he said Ralph..I smell a pile...:agree:
     
  13. Oct 18, 2016 #13

    Snoonyb

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    Nails overdriven and old vents, really?

    The type of shingles you have commonly last 15 to 20yrs.

    A least one of the roofers, who obtain an estimate from, should be an independent contractor, not a salesman.

    Roofer can be found at your local roofing material supplier, other than the big boxes.

    Another source is TheBlueBook.com, which a geographical reference source.
     
  14. Oct 23, 2016 #14

    kmwest

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    Another salesman, this one said, "Your shingles are getting brittle and I'm not wanting to sign up for replacing a few damaged shingles and we end up having to replace a lot more because they're broken during repair..." However he didn't try to sell me a whole new roof since I haven't noticed any leaking or water stains on a ceiling.

    But he also said that since the vents were rusting that they would start getting holes and needing replaced. So fair enough. However he said that the flat roof over our 3-season porch (probably 8 feet by 8 feet square) was poorly roofed with exposed nails, so he is going to give me an estimate on replacing that. (We haven't had any noticeable leaks at all on the 3-season porch either).

    Frankly I'm getting tired of spending afternoons off work to get sales pitches, what should I do here? Money isn't the big issue here, and I know I'll probably need to buy a new roof within a few years (it's at least 10 years old). I just hate getting 10 different opinions from 9 different people, and if I need to do something before winter sets in (I live in Minnesota) it would need to happen very soon.

    Ralph
     
  15. Oct 30, 2016 #15

    kmwest

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    Bump..... any good advice?
     
  16. Oct 31, 2016 #16

    slownsteady

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    Well the second guy seems to make a bit more sense, and it would be hard for any one here to contradict him since he has seen your roof in person. You should bite the bullet and get one or two more contractors to take a look. See who confirms what one or the other has said. That's how you get to the truth of the matter. You will also get a feel for the right contractor as you speak with more of them; a sense of where the sales pitch ends and the trust can begin.
     
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