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How do I remove this old kitchen faucet?

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kepler1

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Hi friendly plumbing crew! I have this kitchen faucet I want to replace, but I ran into some trouble trying to just remove it.

I have a feeling that I need to unscrew what looks like a hexagonal retaining ring/nut on the underside of the sink where all the pipes come through. But it seems like it doesn't move or is very tight at least. It's also almost 2in across -- really huge for the basin wrench jaws. Or maybe I need a bigger one? And the space is really tight to get it in there. All the newer faucets have a better ring now that seems easier to install than this.

I just want to check that there isn't something on the top side that I need to disassemble to get this thing out first? (like through the tap handle or something?)

Thanks!
 

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Snoonyb

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EricK

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You'll definitely need a basin wrench and some patience. Disconnect what you can underneath the faucet. (Know that some water will come out even though you have the valves turned off.) That large, thin nut is holding your faucet in place. Once you get it to break free with the basin wrench it will hopefully spin off by hand the rest of the way. If it seems like that nut is stuck, it could be because there is a bit of mineral deposits. That happens sometimes if there's a small leak or even condensation and water evaporates on the threats and around the nut. Spraying it with a little bit of PB Blaster might help. And sometimes it's easier to break a nut loose by tightening it than by loosening it. So you might want to just try to get the nut to move by tightening it and once it moves flip the basin wrench and then start to loosen it. If the threads are really bad with mineral deposits, loosen it, tighten it a bit, loosen it more, tighten it a bit, etc. This way you work thru any deposits with the least amount of resistance. Once you get that nut off you should be able to lift the faucet straight up through the hole in your counter
 

Jeff Handy

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I have several basin wrenches, and have only had good luck with them a few times.

I have better luck with a huge crescent type wrench, then I turn the handle of that with another wrench, like channel locks or vice grips.
 

Jeff Handy

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You can also cut through the big nut with a multi tool, then pry open the gap with a very big flat screwdriver.
 

Jeff Handy

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Whenever I estimate for changing out a kitchen faucet, I allow two hours to get the old sucker off.
If it comes off easy, I give them a little break on the bill.
It might take 15 mins, or might take two hours of upside down hell, with rust pouring into your eyes.
 

Johnboy555

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2 other options I've used ...
1. If you can get ahold of the nut with the basin wrench but no room to turn it, have someone else turn the faucet counterclockwise from the top while you hold the wrench. ( Obviously this only applies to single hole faucets )
2. Take a 1/8" drill and drill the nut (at the thin section, at the threads) then switch to a 3/16 or 1/4" and the nut will split there. pry it open with a screwdrivers and it falls right off. MAKE SURE TO USE EYE PROTECTION TO KEEP METAL CHIPS OUT OF YOUR EYES! I've had to do this many times with corroded faucets .
 

EricK

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2 other options I've used ...
1. If you can get ahold of the nut with the basin wrench but no room to turn it, have someone else turn the faucet counterclockwise from the top while you hold the wrench. ( Obviously this only applies to single hole faucets )
2. Take a 1/8" drill and drill the nut (at the thin section, at the threads) then switch to a 3/16 or 1/4" and the nut will split there. pry it open with a screwdrivers and it falls right off. MAKE SURE TO USE EYE PROTECTION TO KEEP METAL CHIPS OUT OF YOUR EYES! I've had to do this many times with corroded faucets .
This is a good idea. Although, I hope I never have to do it :)
 

kepler1

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Just an update after I got it all done!

Thank you for all your advice. It was probably 1.5 hours of work, because this faucet seemed to be really old style fittings.

After I was able to loosen the big hexagonal nut (basin wrench, lots of attempts), I found that it wouldn't fit over the water supply line ends (their nuts), because this particular faucet was designed with 2 very large "old style"(?) hard metal supply tubes with joints/sleeves that took additional adapters to the water pipes in the wall (which are otherwise modern standard style).

By the way, this was after I had to cut the flexible braided steel sprayer line because it was in the way, crowding the hexagonal nut from getting off...

Finally after puzzling over all these problems and getting the last off it off, I was able to slide the hexagonal retaining nut off.

Whew. Then amazingly, the new faucet installation just took 10 minutes -- all the new style parts just make so much more sense, and seem more designed for easy removal later.

Thanks all!
 

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